Posts Tagged ‘craig)’

OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone (by Clyde Brolin) – Some More “Book Reviews”

November 25, 2013

Image

Article Title: OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone (by Clyde Brolin) – Some More “Book Reviews
Submitted by: Craig Lock
Category (key words): Books, book reviews, Overdrive, Clyde Brolin, motor racing, motor sport, Grand Prix drivers, Formula One, “the zone”, “in the zone”, sport, success, achievement,
peak performance, mind, mind-power, motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)

Web site: www.overdrivef1.com

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock&sort=relevance&ie=UTF8&qid

http://goo.gl/vTpjk and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
Obsessive …or WHAT!

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig)

Publishing Guidelines:

We hope that the following article may be informative and helpful to your e-zine readers, or on your web site. This piece (as with all my writings) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print, with acknowledgment to the source, please. If it helps and/or encourages others “out there” on the ‘amazing journey of life’, then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

*

Submitter’s Note:

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

…as well as some other books on the minds and spirituality of Grand Prix drivers (“true labours of love”). See http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

“There are only three sports: bullfighting, mountain climbing and motor racing; all the rest are merely games.”

– Ernest Hemingway

“A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racing’s important to men who do it well. When you’re racing, it’s life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting.”

– Steve McQueen in the film ‘Le Mans’ (1971)

“Grand Prix racing is primarily a mental contest… it’s a battle of strength
of wills by the combatants and a magnificent contest, the arena to display
and share unique gifts and talents. Perhaps in this ‘theatre of speed’ F1 is a metaphor for life itself”
– craig

#
OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone – MORE BOOK “REVIEWS”

“I see the human being is an incredible machine, totally undiscovered in many ways. Every one of us has a hidden tank of energy that comes out when it is needed.”

– Alex Zanardi (former F1 and Indycar driver, who lost both legs in a horrific accident in Germany in 2001)

From www. overdrivef1.com

Sourced from: www.overdrivef1.com/review.html

Laurence Edmondson (ESPNF1.com – April 29, 2010)

Talk of being “in the zone” has become clichéd among sportsmen in recent years. It would be easy to assume their vocabulary has simply run short in trying to describe a good performance, but is it possible there is something much deeper and more meaningful to the phrase?

In Overdrive, Clyde Brolin examines the possibility that finding the zone could be a route to some sort of spiritual enlightenment as well as heightened performance. Fortunately, he’s as cynical about the premise as you probably are and the book is more an exploration of the idea, rather than an attempt to prove it. By focusing on F1 drivers’ journeys to the zone he looks at what is truly possible from a man, two pedals (three in the good old days) and a steering wheel.

Brolin’s investigation begins in the most obvious place: Ayrton Senna’s jaw-dropping qualifying lap of Monaco in 1988, in which the Brazilian claimed to have an out-of-body experience while lapping the street circuit 1.427 seconds faster than any of his competitors. It’s a good place to start, but of course you can’t base a whole theory on (whisper it) a self-confessed bible-basher, who might have got carried away in a press conference. Fortunately Brolin hasn’t. In fact, he’s done the opposite and interviewed around 100 other F1 and sporting personalities who have reported similar, if not quite as dramatic, visits to the zone.

This is the book’s biggest strength but also a potential flaw. The accounts are almost endless. But, much like reaching the zone, the hard work is worth it as the book puts beyond any doubt the importance of psychology in sport. What’s more there are some brilliant descriptions of the zone, most notably darts player Bobby George who describes the feeling as, “Like having a thousand starlings flying out of your arsehole”.

So with the premise well and truly established it would seem logical to explore how it’s possible to achieve such a feat. Unfortunately this is the difficult bit, and Brolin doesn’t really attempt to address it. Instead he leaves it to the drivers to try and explain, and judging by their widely differing accounts, there is no single answer. But that’s certainly not a criticism of the book, more proof of just how fascinating the subject topic is.

Masses of time has clearly gone into researching Overdrive, and the end result leaves you looking at some of sport’s greatest achievements in a very different light. The fact that F1 hasn’t embraced sport psychology in the same way as other individual pursuits, such as golf or tennis means a lot of the content is incredibly fresh. While the book is not likely to revolutionise the sport, it will add another dimension for any F1 fan willing to open their mind to it.
*

Simon Briggs (The Daily Telegraph – April 2, 2010)

Imagine piloting an F1 car at 140 mph round the streets of Monaco. It’s a pretty frightening circuit, even for me who have been racing all their lives. The elder Nelson Piquet once said that driving at Monaco felt like ‘flying a helicopter around your living room’.

Now imagine that the car is still romping around those hairpin bends, but rather than watching the road through your helmet visor, you are looking down on yourself impassively from above. You can no longer feel your hands on the wheel or your feet on the pedals; instead, it is as if some third party (God? The id?) is performing all the mechanics quite independently.

Most alarmingly, the car seems to be moving faster than it has ever gone before. That is the sort of out-of-body experience that Ayrton Senna reported after his extraordinary qualifying lap at Monaco in 1988. That drive has gone down in grand prix folklore. After beating his McLaren team-mate Alain Prost by a second-and-a-half, and the rest of the field by fully two seconds, Senna admitted: ‘It frightened me, because I realised I was well beyond my conscious understanding’.

This phenomenon of driving on autopilot fascinated the motor sport writer Clyde Brolin so much that he wrote a book about it. And after 10 years’ labour, he has produced ‘Overdrive’, an analysis of the mental states that top athletes – mostly, but not exclusively racing drivers – go through when they compete. Brolin’s main theme is the concept of ‘the Zone’, that oasis of heightened performance where time seems to slow down. Most of the drivers he spoke to could remember entering this trance-like condition a handful of times during their careers, but only the very best – the Sennas and Schumachers – made a habit of it.

The abandonment of ego, at least temporarily, seems to be one of the prerequisites. According to Jackie Stewart, his early performances in F1 were held back by the red mist that often surrounds the angry young driver. It was only after three years’ racing that he realised he needed to be totally detached, to the point where Stewart was almost humming a tune, while his brain performed its calculations like a computer.

When Brolin consulted other drivers about such stories, many dismissed them as fantasies on a par with Luke Skywalker’s ability to fight blindfolded. But the author was reassured by the fighter pilot, who told him that ‘breakout – where guys feel they’re sitting on the wing looking into the cockpit at themselves – is a well-known phenomenon in military aviation, particularly fast-jet flying.’

For the most, ‘Overdrive’ is insightful and leaves you with a fresh perspective on F1. Which is exactly what Senna experienced in Monaco all those years ago.

**** (four stars)
*
Maurice Hamilton (The Observer – March 7, 2010)

Racing drivers drive as fast as they can. An obvious statement, perhaps, but for a driver at the highest level, finding a tiny bit extra makes the difference between winning and finishing second. When a driver reaches that outer limit, he is in “the zone”. It is an area almost beyond understanding but, once inside it, a driver – or any sports person – experiences a sense of calm and ease of action that comes close to euphoria.

Explaining how it happened is much more difficult, if not impossible. And because, say, a Formula One driver knows he has entered unfamiliar and therefore disturbing areas of the astro-physical and neurological, there is a reluctance to talk about it in case the listener thinks he is either mad or out of control when supposedly in charge of a vehicle capable of 200 mph.

Ayrton Senna broke new ground when he described, without prompting, , an “out-of-car experience”, when claiming pole position for the 1988 Monaco Grand Prix. Senna said the McLaren-Honda was going faster and faster and with such apparent ease that the Brazilian reached the point where he appeared to be above the car, looking down on it. Such an admission from a highly respected driver prompted others to confess that, very occasionally, they had experienced similar inexplicable feelings.

The full extent of this phenomenon has become startlingly apparent in Overdrive. Formula 1 In The Zone, a paper-back book that thoroughly investigates the subject. Clyde Brolin clearly has impeccable contacts and the respect of the racing community, judging by 100 interviews with top drivers and riders.

Brolin spreads his inquires to rallying (Sébastien Loeb), Le Mans (multiple-winner Tom Kristensen) and motor bikes (Valentino Rossi); but it is the F1 drivers who provide the meat for a revealing book on a fascinating subject. Gerhard Berger, the winner of 10 Grands Prix, provides a typical example.

“Qualifying was when you could really find The Zone,” Berger says. “On some days you are fighting the car, everything hurts and nothing seems to fit. You have no lap time and you know it. But at other times you feel yourself reaching a higher level. Everything would be just like in slow motion, everything becomes very smooth and very soft. When you’re really on it, it’s absolutely the best feeling in the world.”
*
Mark Hughes (Autosport magazine – Feb 25, 2010)

Medical understanding of the processes going on within the driver is still at a primitive level. But in a fascinating new book, Overdrive: Formula 1 in the Zone, Clyde Brolin takes a more intuitive look at the subject. He searches out those who have experienced that magical feeling in a racing car where they can do no wrong, where driving absolutely at the limit is the easiest thing in the world. It’s a feeling of invincibility rarely attained even by the top guys, but it is generally accessible by anyone. When a driver reaches this zone, that is when we see pure, undistilled, 100 per cent of his potential. It’s the place of which Ayrton Senna famously and mystically spoke when describing his laps at Monaco in 1988.

Brolin has interviewed many of the sport’s greats, as well as lesser lights and sportspeople from outside motor racing, about the phenomenon and the consistency of the themes is striking. Whether we assign neurological, technical, astrophysical or spiritual explanations to the experience is open for debate. And it would inevitably be a fruitless debate, because of the fundamental intransigence people with expertise in each of those fields tend to have about accepting theories outside their own area of knowledge.

The book doesn’t try to reach a resolution on this, but it does record the views of those who have them. Ironically, it is those with open minds who have ready access to the phenomenon. The only real conclusion the book reaches is that the zone is ‘free to everyone with the correct decoder’; but it ventures no theory on what that decoder is – and is all the better for that.

Brolin took years researching the book and it would be nice if he were rewarded for such dedication to a complex, ultimately unresolved but fascinating subject. Buy it: you’ll have spent a tenner but gained a fascinating insight.
*
Dr Gordon McCabe (McCabism website – Mar 1, 2010
http://mccabism.blogspot.com/2010/03/overdrive-formula-1-in-zone.html)

Overdrive is first and foremost a book about what it is like to be a racing driver ‘in the Zone’. This is the state of mind in which a driver attains mental clarity, he feels at one with the car, and in which driving fast at the very limit feels effortless. This mental state requires the conscious mind to relax its control, and allow the subconscious mind to take over. At times like this, the conscious mind of the driver is able to sit back and observe, from an almost disinterested perspective, the actions of his own body.

It is a unique and fabulous work. The author has extracted a gripping and fascinating collection of lucid recollections from many of the most famous names in motor-sport. Brolin has essentially unearthed a whole world of private experience, which has received little prior attention. The accounts rendered of being in the Zone should be treated as a treasure-trove for psychologists and neuro-scientists, and even the more overtly religious testimonies later in the book can be seen as an interesting anthropological study of the beliefs held by certain modern tribes. Buy it!

Sourced from: www.overdrivef1.com/review.html
*

Overdrive is unlike any motorsport book we’ve read before, focusing as it does solely on the driver’s state of consciousness – as in ‘higher consciousness’, or being ‘in the Zone’.

It begins with the famous story of Ayrton Senna’s 1988 Monaco GP qualifying lap, 1.4 seconds faster than anyone else could manage, after which he claimed to have been undergoing an out-of-body experience, looking down on himself driving the car from above. It’s a great story, backed up by Alain Menu’s gripping eyewitness account.

The episode marked a spiritual awakening for Senna, and had he been alive today, he could doubtless have filled an entire book with other Zonal anecdotes and his thoughtful musings on God and his place in the world. Instead, a supporting cast of numerous other drivers step into the breach. There are some real gems here, from the meditational Andy Priaulx, to the religious Ricardo Zonta, the candid Johnny Herbert or the inspirational Alex Zanardi.

But we felt that some of the other anecdotes of trips to the Zone, however long- or short-lived, don’t add much to the narrative. It’s as if Brolin (an experienced motorsport journalist who writes under a pseudonym) felt the need to include everybody he spoke to on the subject. We’ve no doubt that many more accounts were consigned to Brolin’s Trash folder, but it doesn’t always feel that way, robbing the book of some much-needed pace.

Near the end, there’s also a section on soccer players’ visits to the Zone which, while very interesting at times, seem out of place in this context. So be prepared to skip over a few pages or paras here and there, but for most readers, the unusual insight provided by the likes of Herbert and Priaulx alone will justify your reading the rest of the book.

Review by Graham Heeps
February 2011

If YOU set your heart on it, you can test, challenge and surpass your own “perceived limits” as YOU too “get into your own zone”.

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU …through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life!

Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + totally unmusical motor racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and passion.
True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

” I truly believe we can ALL create and enthuse magic into ‘so-called humdrum little lives’. You don’t just have to be the choreographer, or the conductor of your life script –
rather paint your life as the masterpiece it could (one day) be. There is a rich tapestry of talent in every human soul, that flows through the spirit of God. So don’t spend your
days stringing and tuning your instrument; start making and playing your unique tunes of music right now.”

“Success: how and the spirit with which you face, then overcome the daily obstacles, the frequent trials and tribulations along the
often rocky path-way of life’s magical and mysterious journey. Light your path brightly.”
– craig

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘Inside the Mind of a Grand Prix Champion’, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’ … as well as ‘Driven: Grand Prix Driving on the Edge’ and ‘God and Formula One: Beyond the Zone’

http://www.craiglockbooks.comhttp://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ , as well as the above books) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock&sort=relevance&ie=UTF8&qid

http://goo.gl/vTpjk and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
Obsessive …or WHAT!

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the sources, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken another course!

“Sometimes you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you were meant to live.”

Books by Craig Lock

November 22, 2013

writers block

Books by Craig Lock

Some of my various books written over the years.

Obsessive…or WHAT!

enjoy

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock&sort=relevance&ie=UTF8&qid

http://goo.gl/vTpjk and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children –

MINE!

Don’t worry about the world ending today…

it’s already tomorrow in “little scenic and tranquil” New Zealand

The Traits (Qualities) of a True Champion

August 30, 2013

Aiton senna

Article Title: The Traits (Qualities) of a True Champion (from ‘The Winning Mind’, ‘The Winning Edge’ and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’)
Author: Craig Lock
Category (key words/tags): Champion, Success, Success Principles, Motivation, Inspiration, Sports Psychology, Sport, Mind, Mind Control, Positive Thinking, Peak Performance and
Positive Psychology (enough there now, craig!)

Web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

Publishing Guidelines:
We hope that the following article may be informative and helpful to your e-zine readers, or on your web site.
This piece (as with all my articles) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print. If it helps others “out there” on the pathway to success (and most importantly,
happiness), then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

#
INTRODUCTION

Submitter’s Note:

In his latest writings Craig writes about ordinary people in exceptional circumstances and times; he tries to show the extra-ordinary in ordinary lives: As revealed by the generous spirits and the exceptional strength and courage of so many ordinary people in their daily struggles along the sometimes very difficult and hard, yet often so satisfying journey that is called life. Craig is currently writing true stories of life in the Middle East. And as he writes, is posting (sharing) various thoughts and extracts on his new blog at http://craigsblogs.wordpress and http://craiglock.wordpress.com
Enough of that (what’s that “intro” got to do with the subject of your article, craig?). So back to the article on sport… my great passion.

The follow extract is from Craig’s manuscripts on sport psychology ‘The Winning Mind’, ‘The Winning Edge’ and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Grand Horizons‘ and Craig’s new e-book ‘The Winning Way’ is at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WQSGEI (on which he’s presently “working”!!) . Craig is a sports fanatic “couch-pot-a-toe”, who has been studying the lives of champions for much of his life… and “what makes them tick, what presses their hot buttons?”. Here are some of his notes, that he’s sharing… (in point form) that I’ve made and collected over the years, so thought I’d share.
*

THE QUALITIES (TRAITS) OF A TRUE CHAMPION
DECIDE TO WIN

“During the time of of practice and training, it’s 80% physical and 20% mental; but one the gun goes off it’s the opposite: 80% mental and only 20% physical.”
– the words of American swimmer, Mark Spitz (7 times Olympic Games medal in Munich 1972)

All winning takes place in the mind
True champions have the following characteristics:

* Total discipline

* Determination (great)

* Desperation, ie. an unshakable commitment to their goals (or cause).
“When I put on the helmet, it’s pure rage.”
New Zealand Indycar champion, Scott Dixon


* All champions have the great will to win

* An unshakable belief in their abilities.
True champions, like an Ayrton Senna, are able to find a new level (of performance) – when required, they have the ability to “dig deep” and find something very special inside themselves

* Resilience – it’s the ability to bounce back after setbacks.
“A champ is down at times, but he’s never out.”

* Patience and dedication.

* Consistency of performance

* An outstanding work ethic.
They work really hard at what they do, continually developing their skills. Elite sportspeople keep improving every year. Former multiple womens tennis champion, Martina Navritilova was only average on her early career, but improved hugely with dedication, effort and persistence.
Champions spend hours and hours of practice and rehearsal . (It has been said that it takes about 10000 hours of practice and rehearsal to be the best in the world??? I think it might have been Malcolm Gladwell who said that, but am not sure whether the statement is valid. What do you think?)


“FAIL YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS”
Everyone failure brings you one step closer to ultimate success.
“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”
– basket-baller, Michael Jordan
You only fail, if you quit!

“Winners never quit…and quitters never win!”

The importance of preparation and practice:
England rugby player Johnny Wilkinson has prepared very well in his career with over 25000 kicks.
Pay more attention (focus) on your strengths than your weaknesses; because they, your strengths will set you apart from the competition. Lift you!
Champions rise to the occasion.

Elite athletes have a narrow focus
“Stay focussed, dedicated and motivated.”

– tennis star Novak Djkovic

* Great memory – for minute details. They remember well the precise factors, circumstances and conditions that led to their successes in the past. “A memory on how to move”, eg. Andre Agassi’s great return of serve.
“Super-stars” have a great sense of anticipation, which is learnt. And success (like failure) is a learnt habit.
Great attention to detail as evident in their professional planning the path to success.

* Also the ability to concentrate on many aspects at once…ie, managing their minds!

NB:

WORK is a four letter word. Talent in itself is not sufficient to rise to the pinnacle of success. True champions work really hard (“their butts off”) in developing their abilities to the absolute fullest.

#

SUMMARY
Three resolutions:

* self reliance

* self discipline

* self responsibility
True champions have:
* Talent (“It was as if I was floating on a cloud of endless possibilities…”)

Talent may appear to flow so effortlessly, but doesn’t take into consideration the thousands of effort and practice put in by an athlete

* Discipline

* Tenacity

* The “will to win” (“an indomitable will)
“Strength does not come from physical capacity; it comes from an indomitable will.”
– Mahatma Gandhi (and Lance Armstrong)


* Integrity (you’re now just taking the first steps back on the road to rehabilitation and being “more human”, Tiger!)

* Desperation (a “cast iron” determination to work hard)

* Chrystal clear focus (single-mindedness)

* Consistency of performance (great)
“You look at Valentino Rossi, Michael Schumacher, Tiger Woods, Roger Federer – they back up year after year. I’m not getting too far ahead of myself, but the
motivation will be similar.”
– the words of Jamie Whincup (back-to-back Australian Supercar champion)

And current All Black captain Richie McCaw delivers constant (and consistent) excellent displays of his rugby skills.

NB:
*
Inspiration (they are inspired to regularly deliver elite performances)

* FUN, greatly enjoying what they do..
Discover, then celebrate the champion of life that is in YOU!

If you can dream it, then you can do it!”


And have great fun along the magical journey of life…perhaps even floating on your own cloud of endless possibilities #

Shared by Craig Lock Eagle Productions (“Information and Inspiration Distributer, Writer for Self Empowerment, Incorrigible Encourager and People-builder”)

“If you can imagine it, you can achieve it. If you can dream it,You can become it.”

William Arthur Ward.

# that’s a metaphor, btw

“Life is measured not in years alone, but in achievement.”
– Bruce McLaren (New Zealand racing driver and founder of the McLaren motor racing marque, died 1970)

“To live your life in your own way
To reach the goals you’ve set for yourself
To be the person you want to be –
That is success.”
– author anon.

“There is one only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way”
– Christopher Morley

“The important thing is this: to be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we could become.”
– Charles Du Bois

“I am not just a human being…
I am a human ‘bean’ just becoming.”
– My good friend and “wise” intellectual philosopher, Dr Andy Eastcott (thanks for fixing my teeth and for the most interesting discussions on life, “mate”)

“The roots of true achievement lie in the will to become the best that you can become.”
– Harold Taylor

About the submitter:
Craig believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE. www.craiglockbooks.com


The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ and and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’, as well as his various books on motor racing and the Formula 1 mind) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4    http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

www.lulu.com/craiglock and http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children – mine!

Craig’s new e-book ‘ The Winning Way’ is available at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WQSGEI.

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, empower, uplift and encourage to reach their fullest potentials.”

PS:
Most importantly, have FUN enjoying the life journey

” I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have.”
– Abraham Lincoln

“Oh man! There is no planet sun or star could hold you, if you but knew what you are.”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

“He who cherishes a beautiful vision, a lofty ideal in his heart, will one day realize it. Dream lofty dreams and as you dream so shall you become.”
– James Allen

“No vision and you perish; No Ideal, and you’re lost; Your heart must ever cherish Some faith at any cost. Some hope, some dream to cling to, Some rainbow in the sky, Some melody to sing to, Some service that is high.”
– Harriet Du Autermont

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, empower, uplift and encourage to reach their fullest potentials.”

THIS ARTICLE MAY BE FREELY PUBLISHED

“SPORT FOR PEACE”
“The
peace of the brave is within our reach. We must keep reaching.”
– the words of former US President Bill Clinton in 1993 at the signing of the
peace treaty between Israeli Premier Yatkik Rabin and the PLO’s Yassar Arafat on the lawn of the White House in 1993

PPS
See dad, the dream never died; it just took another course…
“Life is what happens in between making other plans”

– John Lennon

The Mind, the “Top Two Inches” of the Great Grand Prix Drivers

August 29, 2013

SENNA (nu)

Article Title: The Mind, the “Top Two Inches” of the Great Grand Prix Drivers

Submitted by Craig Lock
Key Words: Motor racing, sport, elite performance, champion, champions, Formula 1, great racing drivers, racing drivers, champion drivers, Grand Prix drivers, Grand Prix champions, Formula One champions/drivers, mind, mind-power, “the zone”, success, success principles,
achievement , excellence (enough there now, craig!)

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

Publishing Guidelines:

This piece (as with all my writings) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print. If it helps and/or encourages others “out there” along the ‘amazing journey of life’, then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

#

THE MIND (MINDSET) OF A GRAND PRIX DRIVER

“It’s like a cure for everything. It doesn’t matter what problems you have – financial, in your personal life – and it doesn’t matter, if you feel really ill. All that goes away and only you sitting in this protective cell, this cockpit remains. I have never felt anything like this in any other way and only driving at the limit gives it to you.”

– former Swedish Ferrari F1 driver, Stefan Johansson from ‘Inside the Mind of a Grand Prix Driver’ , a most interesting (and fascinating at least to me!) book that I’m currently reading and researching

Submitter’s Note

Here are some of my notes from research into many books about the very best Grand Prix drivers (of all time). Other (many and varied) sources are from racing magazines, newspaper cuttings with quotes from drivers, many unknown .Enjoy my shared “true labour of passion and love”.

craig

*

Does the racing driver think in a different way from us “ordinary people”?

They are not like you and I…yet we can ALL learn from them at the very pinnacle of achievement…

GREAT GRAND PRIX DRIVERS ALL have:

* Great DESIRE and passion

“I think of all drivers as pie charts. That can be determination, sheer natural talent, technical understanding, PR, personality, whatever. You can have massive reserves of natural talent; but it’s the hunger, it’s the need, that’s the dividing factor.”

“I realised the thing which made me tick was the winning.”

The desire to win is very powerful. It starts as a hobby that they become very good at, and then it becomes a profession.

You have the desire and the passion.

Those who lack mental resilience fall away.

The struggle is a measure of the driver’s desire.

“I think of all drivers as pie charts. That can be determination, sheer natural talent, technical understanding, PR, personality, whatever. You can have massive reserves of natural talent; but it’s the hunger, it’s the need, that’s the dividing factor.”

How much do you want this?

“And if you don’t want it that much, you’re automatically eliminated.”

* Excellent mind-management skills

“This was the reason why I was so strong in my head. There was no mystery: you can do it. But how you prepare your brain and yourself to do this all the time, that I still don’t know.”

“In his mind he was so strong. Ayrton had the invincibility in a slightly different way, because he was religious and he was protected by God.”

– Johnny Herbert

* A rigid self belief – no doubting one’s self.

“Before you believe in anything, you have to believe in yourself.”

“Every driver believes he is the best.”

* Sheer “bloody-minded” determination.

* Confidence (huge doses of it – absolute belief in themselves and their abilities)

“It’s a confidence (inner) that you have, you trust yourself…and your abilities.”

You compare yourself to the best, don’t you? You compare yourself with someone like Senna, who had the ultimate self belief all the time.”

 

They are:

* Very strong mentally, ie they possess mental resilience

“The great drivers had mental strength from the beginning. They brought it with them.”

Mental resilience is what Senna had + rigid self belief. Self doubt was what he did not have!

* They are committed (totally) to their endeavour

“Racing is the most ruthless examination of all the sports I have come across. It’s not about learning, say, to play tennis with a homemade racket; it’s about a total commitment – mental, physical, financial – from the earliest moments. And it finds out the people who won’t make that commitment.”

– the words of former F1 driver, Dr Jonathan Palmer (from Inside the Mind of the Grand Prix Driver by Christopher Hilton (Haynes Publishing, first published 2001)

“I discovered that overtaking is about a mental thing. If I can beat you mentally, I can beat you physically and you’ve had it.”

-Senna

They:

* Concentrate superbly… intensely

“A strong mind and vision in which we see things, the clarity during high pressure situations… and this is what makes some Grand Prix drivers better than others, and makes some of them absolute legends, like Schumacher, Prost, Senna – is that they can take more in… The capacity of Ayrton Senna was obviously only 100%, but he just needed 95% of that to drive his car at 100%; so he always had 5% left to look at the tyres, the strategy, the overtaking – everything you need to be able to do to be exceptional.”

* All leading drivers have a great attention to detail – things must be “just right”… even perfect

* Visualise the flying qualifying lap ahead (whilst in the pits) and the start, whilst sitting on the starting line

“If your brain is strong enough and your concentration is good enough, you do the lap time first in your brain … and then in your car and in your body. That is something the good drivers can do, but only Ayrton Senna made perfect.”

– the words of Karl Wendlinger, former Sauber Grand Prix driver

* they are deeply focussed sportsmen, so focus totally at the task at hand

* Compartamentalise their lives; so that they can isolate the various compartments to (in) their daily lives

“Senna’s mind truly was arranged into a series of compartments and he could isolate them, as required.”

“Ayrton got in his car, went out and set his fastest lap ever round Jerez, even though 20 minutes beforehand he had seen me struggling for my life. He was able to pull his visor down and blank that out of his mind. Then he went to the Press Conference, as he had to do, and then he went to the medical centre to see if I was all right.”

– Martin Donnelly (severely injured after a crash at Jerez, Spain in 1990, which led to his retirement from the sport)

and

* Continually challenge their abilities, their unique talents

* Push the boundaries of their abilities a bit further than what seems possible (continually).

and

there are no limits in performance, so they are driven to the very highest standards… to perfection

*

A few final thoughts to end off…

WORK is a four letter word. Talent in itself is not sufficient to rise to the pinnacle of success. True champions work really hard (“their butts off”) in developing their abilities to the absolute fullest.

Fulfil YOUR (unique) potential (or as Abraham Maslow called it, “self actualisation”).

BECOME ALL THAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF BEING

If YOU set your heart on it, YOU too can became a champion…

and reach NEW HORIZONS in your own life

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life.

Shared by Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + motor-racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Success is doing the best you can, in as many ways as you can.
It is being just and honest and true – not in a few things,
but in everything you do.

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a “passionate petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

http://members.tripod.com/~lock77/www.craiglockbooks.com and www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ and and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’) are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

Craig’s new e-book ‘The Winning Way’ is at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WQSGEI.

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and
passion. True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

“A champion is not a title, but a set of qualities: Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with dedication, purpose, desire and passion. True champions LIVE the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their
fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

A Tribute to Ayrton Senna: Ayrton ‘In the Zone’ : ‘Senna’ – A Film “Review”

August 29, 2013

Image

Article Title: A Tribute to Ayrton Senna: Ayrton ‘In the Zone’ : ‘Senna’ – A Film “Review”
Submitted by: Craig Lock
Category (key words): Ayrton Senna, Motor racing, motor sport, Grand Prix drivers, film “reviews”, “book reviews”, Formula One, “the zone”, “in the zone”, ‘Racing in the Zone’, ‘FI in the Zone’, Grand Prix racing, sport, success, achievement,
peak performance, mind, mind-power, motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)
Web site:
http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
 
 
his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig)

 

Publishing Guidelines:

All my articles may be freely published. If this article is published, please acknowledge the source, thanks.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

#

.

A TRIBUTE TO AYRTON SENNA: AYRTON ‘IN THE ZONE’

 

Submitter’s Note:

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION’, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

I came across this great (and well-written) article by a former F1 photogrpapher named Carlos in my research for a book I’m currently writing to be titled ‘Racing in the Zone’ and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’, so am sharing as a tribute to the “late and great” Ayrton Senna. (Thanks, Carlos). So enjoy…

“A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racing’s important to men who do it well. When you’re racing, it’s life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting.”

– Steve McQueen in the film ‘Le Mans’ (1971)

Racing, competing, he said, it ‘s in my blood. It s part of me, it’s part of my life; I have been doing it all my life and it stands out above everything else.

 

And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

 

And suddenly I realized that I was no longer driving the car consciously. I was driving it by a kind of instinct, only I was in a different dimension.”

-The “late great” Ayrton Senna

 

 

Ayrton Senna Documentary Wins Top Honors at Sundance Film Festival

 

From:

http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

 

Monday, January 31, 2011

 

Ayrton Senna was the greatest race-car driver of all time. He occupies a singular place at the pinnacle of Formula 1 racing, above the greats of the sport, from Juan Manuel Fangio and Jim Clark to Gilles Villeneuve and Formula 1’s winningest champion, Michael Schumacher. In Brazil Ayrton Senna stands shoulder-to-shoulder with Pele, the world s all-time greatest footballer and FIFA s athlete of the century, in legendary stature.

 

And what a legend he was. Ayrton Senna s awesome talent was off the charts. A racing writer who had considered Gilles Villeneuve to be the best and most spectacular racecar driver ever changed his mind after watching hours of film of Senna’s races. He realized, he said, that Senna was spectacular all of the time. Yesterday, the documentary Senna received top honors in its category at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival. Here is a review. It seems to be an exceptional film about an exceptional man.

 

Ayrton Senna pushed the envelope to its very limit. He redefined pushing the envelope. He stepped outside it and took one, two, three a four steps beyond where anyone had ever gone. Or could go. It’s been said there is no more intense human activity short of war than Formula 1 racing. Or at least the Formula 1 racing of the 80s and 90’s, when Senna reigned supreme over rivals Nigel Mansell, Alain Prost, and fellow countryman Nelson Piquet.

There was one memorable confrontation between Ayrton Senna and Nelson Piquet during the Hungarian Grand Prix that recalled that famous scene in ‘Rebel Without a Cause’ in which the two rivals play a game of chicken by drag racing to the edge of a precipice. Whoever brakes first “chickens out” and loses the game. Piquet was in the lead going into the straightaway with Senna fast on his tail.

 

Nelson Piquet had the better team, the better car, Williams, and was vying for the World Driving Championship, which he would go on to win that year. Senna was the “young gun” driving for Lotus, the legendary team of hat-tossing Colin Chapman. Lotus had seen better days with another famous Brazilian racer, Emerson Fittipaldi, and then Mario Andretti at the wheel, as they steered its striking John Player Special black-and-gold cars to World Driving and Constructors Championships.

 

As Senna zoomed up behind Piquet, drafting and dancing in his mirrors, which did not faze the unflappable Piquet, famous for having the lowest heart rate in the drivers community and snoozing in his car during a race start delay – he was piloting an inferior Lotus race-car, which had won its last Grand Prix races, back-to-back, earlier that year at Monaco and Detroit, owing to Senna s prodigious talent.

 

They raced down the straightaway flat-out, sparks flying as the cars bottomed out on the rough Hungarian track. Piquet had the lead and the inside line. Then Senna made his move. He swung outside and pulled up alongside Piquet. They were racing wheel-to-wheel toward a hard-braking sharp right-hand turn at the end of the straightaway. Senna was supremely confident of his ability to outbrake anyone going into a turn and still maintain control of the car. Piquet knew it. He knew that if he braked too soon, he would be overtaken by Senna. Too late and he would be forced to over-compensate, losing his line and taking a wide outside turn. He knew Senna would shoot the inside gap and have him, either way. So Piquet took the only option left to retain the lead. He dived into the corner, “hot” braking (ever so) late and hard, going into a controlled skid. Piquet’s rear end waggled momentarily; but then his tires gripped asphalt and accelerated out, holding his line, with Senna’s black Lotus boring in and riding up his tail.

 

It was racing in its purest form. Nelson Piquet had the better car, yet had to summon every trick in his arsenal to hold off the hard-charging Ayrton Senna. It was a risky manoeuvre, but it probably saved Piquet the championship. I remember thinking, ‘Yo Senna, cut your compadre a break; he s got enough troubles handling teammate Nigel Mansell without you giving him a hard time’.

 

But that’s not how Ayrton Senna thought. He finished second that day, behind Piquet, and looked none too happy about it. Senna once said about losing: “Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.”

 

Senna had many memorable quotes:

 

Racing, competing, he said, it ‘s in my blood. It s part of me, it’s part of my life; I have been doing it all my life and it stands out above everything else.

 

And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

 

And suddenly I realized that I was no longer driving the car consciously. I was driving it by a kind of instinct, only I was in a different dimension.”

 

(His famous words on qualifying at Monaco in 1988, when he was almost in a zen-like state and almost an unheard of 2 seconds faster than his nearest and bitterest rival)

 

Having seen Ayrton Senna drive at the peak of his Zen-like performance, it once occurred to me that the phrase ‘in the zone’ could have been conjured up with him in mind. After several unsuccessful attempts to capture this ethereal quality, because he was too fast for my camera’s shutter, I think I got close with this shot of Senna on his way to winning the 1988 Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. It’s not a camera trick or Photoshop. Everything around him is a speed blur. But Senna’s famous red and white McLaren stands out in high relief, as if floating within a bubble of calm. Not too bad for an amateur photographer!

 

That was Ayrton Senna ‘in the zone’. Some of those performances were so amazing that he’d take the lead and keep increasing it until he had lapped almost the entire field and was nearly a minute ahead of his closest competitor. That is unheard of. Senna lost a few races this way, such that once having eliminated his competition early, he raced against himself trying to top his own personal best. With fewer than ten laps remaining, he didn t fail, but his car sometimes did, breaking down mechanically. It was frustrating to think that if only he’d eased off, he could have coasted to victory. But that wasn’t Ayrton Senna.

 

On compromise, this is what the uncompromising Ayrton Senna had to say: “You must take the compromise to win, or else nothing. That means: you race or you do not. (President Obama must have channeled Senna, when he was criticized for compromising on taxes with the Republicans.)

 

Ayrton Senna had a sense of fatalism about how he lived his life. Four months before his death, he said: “If I m going to live, I want to live fully. Very intensely, because I am an intense person. It would ruin my life if I had to live partially.”

 

Posted by Carlos at Monday, January 31, 2011

From:

http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

 

Thanks for sharing a great piece of writing, Carlos…. which in turn, I’m passing on…

craig (another passionate F1 fan)

If YOU set your heart on it, you can test, challenge and surpass your own “perceived limits” as YOU too “get into your own zone”.

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU …through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life!

Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + totally unmusical motor racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and passion.
True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

” I truly believe we can ALL create and enthuse magic into ‘so-called humdrum little lives’. You don’t just have to be the choreographer, or the conductor of your life script –
rather paint your life as the masterpiece it could (one day) be. There is a rich tapestry of talent in every human soul, that flows through the spirit of God. So don’t spend your
days stringing and tuning your instrument; start making and playing your unique tunes of music right now.”

“Success: how and the spirit with which you face, then overcome the daily obstacles, the frequent trials and tribulations along the
often rocky path-way of life’s magical and mysterious journey. Light your path brightly.”
– craig

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.
Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

He’s also currently writing a new book to be titled ‘Racing in the Zone’ and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’. Obsessive or WHAT!!!

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
 
 

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the source web site, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken another course!

“Sometimes you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you were meant to live.”

“I want to write the way Gilles Villeneuve drove and power-slid his blood-red Formula One Ferrari… with wild enthusiasm and a sense of abandonment, combined with the artists craft of a Stirling Moss, a Jim Clark, and especially that of the great Ayrton Senna, living on the razor-blade edge of life.”
for dearest mom and dad, your spirits lives on (forever)
thanks for all the support, encouragement and especially love
 
“All the world will be happier and better, when the men and women have the souls of artists,, like that of an Ayrton Senna.
– craig (as inspired by Rodin’s famous words)

Sharing Some Quotes from the “late, great” Ayrton Senna

August 29, 2013

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Article Title: Sharing Some Quotes from the “late, great” Ayrton Senna

Submitted by Craig Lock
Key Words: Motor racing, Ayrton Senna,, sport, elite performance, champion, champions, Formula 1, great racing drivers, racing drivers, champion drivers, Grand Prix drivers, Grand Prix champions, Formula One champions/drivers, mind, mind-power, “the zone”, success, success principles,
achievement , excellence (enough there now, craig!)
Web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.
Obsessive or WHAT!

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

*

SHARING SOME QUOTES FROM THE “LATE, GREAT” AYRTON SENNA

(from ‘The Yellow Helmet’ by craig lock)

“Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.”

– “the great” Ayrton

A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racing is important to men who do it well. When you re racing, it’s life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting.”

– Steve McQueen in the film Le Mans (1971)

“Then you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

I was already on pole, then by half a second and then one second and I just kept going. Suddenly I was nearly two seconds faster than anybody else, including my team mate with the same car.

And suddenly I realised that I was no longer driving the car consciously. I was driving it by a kind of instinct, only I was in a different dimension.

It was like I was in a tunnel. Not only the tunnel under the hotel but the whole circuit was a tunnel. I was just going and going, more and more and more and more. I was way over the limit but still able to find even more.

Because in a split second, it’s gone.

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

Fear is exciting for me.

I continuously go further and further learning about my own limitations, my body limitation, psychological limitations. It’s a way of life for me.

I don’t know driving in another way which isn’t risky. Each one has to improve himself. Each driver has its limit. My limit is a little bit further than other’s.

I have no idols. I admire work, dedication and competence.

If you have God on your side, everything becomes clear.

I am able to experience God’s presence on earth.

It’s going to be a season with lots of accidents, and I’ll risk saying that we’ll be lucky if something really serious doesn’t happen.

Money is a strange business. People who haven’t got it aim it strongly. People who have are full of troubles.

My biggest error? Something that is to happen yet.

Of course there are moments that you wonder how long you should be doing it because there are other aspects which are not nice, of this lifestyle. But I just love winning.

On a given day, a given circumstance, you think you have a limit.

The danger sensation is exciting. The challenge is to find new dangers.

Then suddenly something just kicked me. I kind of woke up and realised that I was in a different atmosphere than you normally are. My immediate reaction was to back off, slow down.

There are no small accidents on this circuit.

*

These things bring you to reality as to how fragile you are; at the same moment you are doing something that nobody else is able to do. The same moment that you are seen as the best, the fastest and somebody that cannot be touched, you are enormously fragile.

Wealthy men can’t live in an island that is encircled by poverty. We all breathe the same air. We must give a chance to everyone, at least a basic chance.

When you are fitted in a racing car and you race to win, second or third place is not enough.

Winning is the most important. Everything is consequence of that.

Women – always in trouble with them, but can’t live without them.

You must take the compromise to win, or else nothing. That means: you race or you do not.

You will never know the feeling of a driver when winning a race. The helmet hides feelings that cannot be understood.

Racing, competing, it’s in my blood. It’s part of me, it’s part of my life; I have been doing it all my life and it stands out above everything else.”

– Ayrton Senna

Sourced from: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/a/ayrton_senna_2.html#ixzz1PeuTrxjj

*

If YOU set your heart on it, you can test, challenge and surpass your own “perceived limits” and YOU too can became a champion (your OWN)!

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life.

Shared (with thanks) by craig (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + totally unmusical motor racing fanatic and passionate petrol-head “)

“A champion is not a title, but a set of qualities: Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with dedication, purpose, desire and passion. True champions LIVE the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”

– craig

“I’d rather attempt something great and fail, rather than attempting nothing and succeed.”

– Norman Vincent Peale

“Some people see things as they are and say ‘why?’. I see the dreams that never were and say ‘why not?'”

– Bobby Kennedy

“Our talents are our gifts from God…

but what we do with our talents are our gifts TO God.”

About the submitter:

Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a “passionate petrol-head”), who loves to test his own writing limits and challenge his imagination to the’fullest’. He believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including his various books on motor racing) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The Yellow Helmet is available at http://www.amazon.com/Yellow-Helmet-White-Helmets-ebook/dp/B006E8TABM

His various e-books on his great love/passion motor racing (including the White, Yellow, Red and Blue Helmets) are available at http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.
Obsessive or WHAT!

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

PPS

THE WILL TO WIN

“To drive fearlessly to win is to win another race – the race against fear –

(trophies themselves are but symbols to delight old age);

To challenge your fellow man in peaceful pursuit

Of courage is the epitome of courage;

To lose the race with grace is the embodiment of grace itself.

To triumph is to achieve glory

But glory is empty without the overthrow of fear, the acquisition

Of courage, of grace –

For the possession of these is the true glory.

Good breeding is displayed in the ability to lose well

And is primarily engendered by respect:

Respect is created by the acknowledgement not of the other man’s shortcomings or faults

But essentially the acknowledgement of his virtues –

For without virtue

What is man – be he on the track challenging the fates,

Or on a bed of sleep?

L.F.

(from The International Grand Prix Book of Motor Racing (Edited by Michael Frewin and first published by Leslie Frewin, London in 1965)

“Aim at the stars, because you might just reach them.”

“You think you have a limit. And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.”

-Ayrton Senna

Who and What is a True Champion?

August 27, 2013


Image

Article Title: Who and What is a True Champion?
Submitted by Craig Lock
Key Words: Champion, Champions, Traits of champions, Character, Success, Success Principles, Motivation, Inspiration, Sports Psychology, Sport, Mind, Mind Control, Positive Thinking and
Positive Psychology (enough there now, craig!)

Craig’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007E2WXW0 and http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
Obsessive…or WHAT!

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

Publishing Guidelines:
This piece, in point-form (as with all my articles) may be freely published, electronically or in print.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

*

WHO AND WHAT IS A CHAMPION?

A champion is more than a mere title. Rather, it is a set, a collection of personal qualities. What are some of these qualities that make a champion?

Firstly,
* Ability = natural TALENT… which is then developed through continual practice

* Belief in ones abilities (“believe it to achieve it”)

Champions have the vital seven (“lucky”) ‘C’s’:

Firstly,

* Character

“Character, rather than our gifts (talents) is  the true measure of success.”

– me

* Clarity of mind (of thinking)

Clarity of purpose (keeps a champion “driving on”)

Champions have a FOCUS (narrow)… putting all their energies into a single focus. (Unbalanced, obsessive… like this writer. Sorry, Marie, Gareth and Sean!)

* Confidence: They have great confidence in their abilities. Self Belief is the key here.
Champions really “trust their game”, especially in times of pressure… “when the heat is really on”.

Champion racing drivers possess great powers of concentration, where the slightest mistake in 2 hours racing at Monaco, like being half a metre off the ideal line could send the car sliding into the Armco barriers surrounding the track*

* Courage: Vast amounts of courage and determination in overcoming many obstacles to get to the very top of their field

* Commitment (total): Commitment to the “drudge”of continual practice – honing and developing skills. Commitment and resolve to “keep on keeping on” through the tough times.
“Tough times don’t last, but tough people do.”

and finally (of the “C’s”),
* Champions are consistent. True champions demonstrate great consistency of performance. That is the hallmark, consistently delivering top (excellent) displays and results.

They usually deliver elite performances… year after year.
When things look bleak and “the chips are down”, champions rise to the occasion, just like cream rises to the top.
*

Then come the five “D’s”

* Desire

* Discipline (self)
* Determination in overcoming disappointment(s) – how human beings can prevail over very trying circumstances.

“Your greatest obstacle can become your sweetest triumph.”
– Lance Armstrong

* Desperation: “How much do you want it?” (“God responds to desperation”):

* Dedication (= hard work): “What are you prepared to sacrifice to achieve success?”

“Stay focussed, dedicated and motivated.”

– tennis star Novak Djkovic

Tenacity in overcoming adversity.

“I hated every minute of training, but I said, ”Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.”
– Muhammed Ali

(Keep on writing then, craig!) #

“A wish is just a wish, A New Years Resolution is just a
resolution. Goals have deadlines and are stepping stones
down the path, the stair-case to your
dreams.”

“Meeting a goal takes dedication, effort and sacrifice and
all that it takes to turn a goal into a dream is TIME.”
– craig

* Mental strength… to handle the intense pressures of competition

* Unity of effort: The ability to work with others (ie teamwork); because you can’t make it on your own. Everyone has different skills and abilities – that is what makes them unique!

“And in this there is for us mere mortals a sobering humility in the knowledge that they have not just had the gifts, but were prepared to work far beyond the normal physical and mental boundaries to develop them to the full extent of their powers.”
– fine writing by Ian Gillies writing about former All-Black rugby player Ian Kirkpatrick in the Gisborne Herald (web site
www.gisborneherald.co.nz/article/?id=17486 )

* the “Will-to-win”
“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.”
– Mahatma Gandhi (and Lance Armstrong)

Champions have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.”
– Muhammad Ali

* P= Persistence and perseverance
Champions succeed where so many others give up.

Still you don’t have to come first… at first. Just keep your torch shining the longest and brightest… then you”ll be a winner , a champ in the game of life

And

* Inspiration. (“I don’t wait to get inspired, but once I start work, writing, the inspiration simply comes, arising in my consciousness”- anon).

‘Leap and the net will appear.’

*

Vision: Champions have a vision – they know where they want to go and where they are headed in the future. So to get there they set goals- short-term , intermediate and long-term…and most importantly, they don’t get put off by obstacles and temporary “failures”. They say:”I just haven’t succeeded…yet.”

NB: Champions have an unconquerable spirit.

Conquering others requires force. Conquering oneself requires strength.”
– Lao Tzu; Tao Te Ching

The highest mountain we have to conquer is our OWN!

Finally, champions have a great sense of purpose, ie. a life mission. True champions have a strong commitment to pursue an endeavour… one that is born out of their sense of purpose and that lasts a life-time.

“This is what I was put on earth to do.”

There is unlimited potential in the human condition. ANY individual human being can cultivate the values of self respect, self-reliance and self discipline, which will greatly enhance their life. Like a champion, ‘ordinary’ (what’s that!) people also have great capacity and potential to achieve… even the “extra-ordinary” in life.

“A glorious destiny that rises above the limitless horizons of the human condition.”

Discover, then celebrate the champion of life in YOU…

because

“YOU (and everyone) are all champions in your own way!”

Shared by Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer, Writer for Self Empowerment, Incorrigible Encourager and People-builder”)

“Champions aren’t made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them: A desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.”
– Muhammad Ali

“You are not what you think you are; but what you think, you ARE!”

“Success is to be measured not so much by the position one has reached in life, as by the obstacles which he (or she) has overcome, while trying to succeed.”
– Booker T. Washington

“The task ahead of you can always be overcome by the power within you…and the often seemingly difficult or even “impassible”) path ahead of you is never as steep with the great spirit that lies within you.”
– craig

“If you think you are beaten, you are.
If you think you dare not, you do not.
If you would like to win but think you can not
It is almost a cinch you will not.

If you think you will lose, you are lost.
For out in the world we find
Success begins with a fellow’s will;
It is all in the state of mind.

If you think you are outclassed, you are.
You have got to think to rise.
You have got to be sure of yourself
Before you can win the prize.

Life’s battles do not always go
To the stronger or faster man.
But sooner or later the man who wins is
The one who thinks he can.”

– Author Unknown

Ïf you can dream it,

You can DO it!

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials.”

PPS:

THE CHAMPIONS CREED

“Never underestimate your opponent.
Work on your weaknesses until they become your strengths.
Remember that a great effort is usually the result of a great
attitude.
Dedicate yourself to a mighty purpose.
Win with humility, lose with grace.
Ignore those who discourage you.
Remember that how you conduct yourself out of the pool is just as important as how you conduct yourself in the pool.
Talent is God-given – so be humble.
Fame is man-given – so be thankful.
Remember when you’re not working to improve, your competition is.

Always give your best.

PRACTICE like a champion.
SWIM like a champion.
LIVE like a champion.”

– anon

“GOOD IS NOT GOOD ENOUGH WHEN GREATNESS IS POSSIBLE

“We can all be great, because we can ALL serve others in some way.”

– Mother Teresa

“Great people are just ordinary people, who usually find themselves in extra-ordinary situations…and who possess extra-ordinary amounts of determination.”

“I am a champion.
I believe in myself.
I have the will to win.
I set high goals for myself.
I surround myself with winners.
I’m cool, positive, and confident.
I’m willing to pay the price of success.
I stay relaxed and in control at all times.
I focus all my energy on the job at hand.
I take responsibility for all of my results.
I have the courage to endure and persist.
I vividly imagine what victory will feel like.
I am a champion and I will win.”

Three-Time Olympian – Ruben Gonzalez
www.OlympicMotivation.com

About the author:
Craig has been studying the human mind and the lives of elite sportspeople for much of his life (a great passion of his). He believes in sharing information and insights to try to make a difference in this world: to help and especially encourage people along life’s magical journey … and that brings him the greatest joy.

www.craiglockbooks.comhttp://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4  http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

www.lulu.com/craiglock and http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock

Craig’s new book The Spirit of a True Champion: A Look into the Mind of Jesus Christ (The Champion) [Kindle Edition] is available at

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007E2WXW0

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com
Obsessive…or WHAT!

Craig loves writing about ‘ordinary’ (what’s that?) people in exceptional circumstances and times. He is currently writing true stories of life in the Middle East. And as he writes, is posting (sharing) various thoughts and extracts on his various blogs at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

STOP. Enough there now, craig. Your “signature” is already longer than your article!

OK, then I’ll just add a bit to the article

PPS:

Thanks for everything, dad. See the dream never died – it’s just taken another course!

craig

“Sometimes you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you were meant to live.”

“I’d rather attempt something great and fail, rather than attempting nothing and succeed.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Some people see things as they are and say ‘why?’. I see the dreams that never were and say ‘why not?'”
– Bobby Kennedy

“The empires of the future are the empires of the mind”

– Winston Churchill (in his speech to Harvard University in 1943)

“A champion is not a title, but a set of qualities: Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with dedication, purpose, desire and passion. True champions LIVE the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– me

#
As they carry me to my deathbed, I’ll be saying:
“Lord,
Can you just give me one more hour to finish off this one last article, or book…. PLEASE!”
– craig (as inspired by the quote of singer, Barry Manilow)

THIS ARTICLE MAY BE FREELY PUBLISHED

PPS

Click on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhAghiP-5Fk

Also see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMA1eYdLZLM

and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQI5LtRtrb0

“When (or perhaps if ever) you arrive in heaven, let hope, faith and love be the wings that carried you there.”
– as adapted from the inspiring words of Jonathan Edwards, former minister in New England, Massachusetts

“The Greatest Race: Living by (with) faith, hope and love is the highest podium any person can reach, God’s podium that anyone stand on.”

– craig

“Having pursued the goals, the dreams set before us and run the race with persistence and endurance, after giving it all. Then one day standing on the summit of life, breathing in the pure sweet oxygen of achievement, totally satisfied in running the greatest race, the race of life one that ANYONE can run and win.”

craig 11/11

from The Chequered Flag
http://www.amazon.co.uk/THE-CHEQUERED-FLAG-GREATEST-ebook/dp/B0064R6D36

 

OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone (by Clyde Brolin) – Some More “Book Reviews”

August 27, 2013

Article Title: Image
OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone (by Clyde Brolin) – Some More “Book Reviews
Submitted by: Craig Lock
Category (key words): Books, book reviews, Overdrive, Clyde Brolin, motor racing, motor sport, Grand Prix drivers, Formula One, “the zone”, “in the zone”, sport, success, achievement,
peak performance, mind, mind-power, motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)

Web site: www.overdrivef1.com

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig)

Publishing Guidelines:

We hope that the following article may be informative and helpful to your e-zine readers, or on your web site. This piece (as with all my writings) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print, with acknowledgment to the source, please. If it helps and/or encourages others “out there” on the ‘amazing journey of life’, then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

*

Submitter’s Note:

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

…as well as some other books on the minds and spirituality of Grand Prix drivers (“true labours of love”). See http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

“There are only three sports: bullfighting, mountain climbing and motor racing; all the rest are merely games.”

– Ernest Hemingway

“A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racing’s important to men who do it well. When you’re racing, it’s life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting.”

– Steve McQueen in the film ‘Le Mans’ (1971)

“Grand Prix racing is primarily a mental contest… it’s a battle of strength
of wills by the combatants and a magnificent contest, the arena to display
and share unique gifts and talents. Perhaps in this ‘theatre of speed’ F1 is a metaphor for life itself”
– craig

#
OVERDRIVE: Formula One In The Zone – MORE BOOK “REVIEWS”

“I see the human being is an incredible machine, totally undiscovered in many ways. Every one of us has a hidden tank of energy that comes out when it is needed.”

– Alex Zanardi (former F1 and Indycar driver, who lost both legs in a horrific accident in Germany in 2001)

From www. overdrivef1.com

Sourced from: www.overdrivef1.com/review.html

Laurence Edmondson (ESPNF1.com – April 29, 2010)

Talk of being “in the zone” has become clichéd among sportsmen in recent years. It would be easy to assume their vocabulary has simply run short in trying to describe a good performance, but is it possible there is something much deeper and more meaningful to the phrase?

In Overdrive, Clyde Brolin examines the possibility that finding the zone could be a route to some sort of spiritual enlightenment as well as heightened performance. Fortunately, he’s as cynical about the premise as you probably are and the book is more an exploration of the idea, rather than an attempt to prove it. By focusing on F1 drivers’ journeys to the zone he looks at what is truly possible from a man, two pedals (three in the good old days) and a steering wheel.

Brolin’s investigation begins in the most obvious place: Ayrton Senna’s jaw-dropping qualifying lap of Monaco in 1988, in which the Brazilian claimed to have an out-of-body experience while lapping the street circuit 1.427 seconds faster than any of his competitors. It’s a good place to start, but of course you can’t base a whole theory on (whisper it) a self-confessed bible-basher, who might have got carried away in a press conference. Fortunately Brolin hasn’t. In fact, he’s done the opposite and interviewed around 100 other F1 and sporting personalities who have reported similar, if not quite as dramatic, visits to the zone.

This is the book’s biggest strength but also a potential flaw. The accounts are almost endless. But, much like reaching the zone, the hard work is worth it as the book puts beyond any doubt the importance of psychology in sport. What’s more there are some brilliant descriptions of the zone, most notably darts player Bobby George who describes the feeling as, “Like having a thousand starlings flying out of your arsehole”.

So with the premise well and truly established it would seem logical to explore how it’s possible to achieve such a feat. Unfortunately this is the difficult bit, and Brolin doesn’t really attempt to address it. Instead he leaves it to the drivers to try and explain, and judging by their widely differing accounts, there is no single answer. But that’s certainly not a criticism of the book, more proof of just how fascinating the subject topic is.

Masses of time has clearly gone into researching Overdrive, and the end result leaves you looking at some of sport’s greatest achievements in a very different light. The fact that F1 hasn’t embraced sport psychology in the same way as other individual pursuits, such as golf or tennis means a lot of the content is incredibly fresh. While the book is not likely to revolutionise the sport, it will add another dimension for any F1 fan willing to open their mind to it.
*

Simon Briggs (The Daily Telegraph – April 2, 2010)

Imagine piloting an F1 car at 140 mph round the streets of Monaco. It’s a pretty frightening circuit, even for me who have been racing all their lives. The elder Nelson Piquet once said that driving at Monaco felt like ‘flying a helicopter around your living room’.

Now imagine that the car is still romping around those hairpin bends, but rather than watching the road through your helmet visor, you are looking down on yourself impassively from above. You can no longer feel your hands on the wheel or your feet on the pedals; instead, it is as if some third party (God? The id?) is performing all the mechanics quite independently.

Most alarmingly, the car seems to be moving faster than it has ever gone before. That is the sort of out-of-body experience that Ayrton Senna reported after his extraordinary qualifying lap at Monaco in 1988. That drive has gone down in grand prix folklore. After beating his McLaren team-mate Alain Prost by a second-and-a-half, and the rest of the field by fully two seconds, Senna admitted: ‘It frightened me, because I realised I was well beyond my conscious understanding’.

This phenomenon of driving on autopilot fascinated the motor sport writer Clyde Brolin so much that he wrote a book about it. And after 10 years’ labour, he has produced ‘Overdrive’, an analysis of the mental states that top athletes – mostly, but not exclusively racing drivers – go through when they compete. Brolin’s main theme is the concept of ‘the Zone’, that oasis of heightened performance where time seems to slow down. Most of the drivers he spoke to could remember entering this trance-like condition a handful of times during their careers, but only the very best – the Sennas and Schumachers – made a habit of it.

The abandonment of ego, at least temporarily, seems to be one of the prerequisites. According to Jackie Stewart, his early performances in F1 were held back by the red mist that often surrounds the angry young driver. It was only after three years’ racing that he realised he needed to be totally detached, to the point where Stewart was almost humming a tune, while his brain performed its calculations like a computer.

When Brolin consulted other drivers about such stories, many dismissed them as fantasies on a par with Luke Skywalker’s ability to fight blindfolded. But the author was reassured by the fighter pilot, who told him that ‘breakout – where guys feel they’re sitting on the wing looking into the cockpit at themselves – is a well-known phenomenon in military aviation, particularly fast-jet flying.’

For the most, ‘Overdrive’ is insightful and leaves you with a fresh perspective on F1. Which is exactly what Senna experienced in Monaco all those years ago.

**** (four stars)
*
Maurice Hamilton (The Observer – March 7, 2010)

Racing drivers drive as fast as they can. An obvious statement, perhaps, but for a driver at the highest level, finding a tiny bit extra makes the difference between winning and finishing second. When a driver reaches that outer limit, he is in “the zone”. It is an area almost beyond understanding but, once inside it, a driver – or any sports person – experiences a sense of calm and ease of action that comes close to euphoria.

Explaining how it happened is much more difficult, if not impossible. And because, say, a Formula One driver knows he has entered unfamiliar and therefore disturbing areas of the astro-physical and neurological, there is a reluctance to talk about it in case the listener thinks he is either mad or out of control when supposedly in charge of a vehicle capable of 200 mph.

Ayrton Senna broke new ground when he described, without prompting, , an “out-of-car experience”, when claiming pole position for the 1988 Monaco Grand Prix. Senna said the McLaren-Honda was going faster and faster and with such apparent ease that the Brazilian reached the point where he appeared to be above the car, looking down on it. Such an admission from a highly respected driver prompted others to confess that, very occasionally, they had experienced similar inexplicable feelings.

The full extent of this phenomenon has become startlingly apparent in Overdrive. Formula 1 In The Zone, a paper-back book that thoroughly investigates the subject. Clyde Brolin clearly has impeccable contacts and the respect of the racing community, judging by 100 interviews with top drivers and riders.

Brolin spreads his inquires to rallying (Sébastien Loeb), Le Mans (multiple-winner Tom Kristensen) and motor bikes (Valentino Rossi); but it is the F1 drivers who provide the meat for a revealing book on a fascinating subject. Gerhard Berger, the winner of 10 Grands Prix, provides a typical example.

“Qualifying was when you could really find The Zone,” Berger says. “On some days you are fighting the car, everything hurts and nothing seems to fit. You have no lap time and you know it. But at other times you feel yourself reaching a higher level. Everything would be just like in slow motion, everything becomes very smooth and very soft. When you’re really on it, it’s absolutely the best feeling in the world.”
*
Mark Hughes (Autosport magazine – Feb 25, 2010)

Medical understanding of the processes going on within the driver is still at a primitive level. But in a fascinating new book, Overdrive: Formula 1 in the Zone, Clyde Brolin takes a more intuitive look at the subject. He searches out those who have experienced that magical feeling in a racing car where they can do no wrong, where driving absolutely at the limit is the easiest thing in the world. It’s a feeling of invincibility rarely attained even by the top guys, but it is generally accessible by anyone. When a driver reaches this zone, that is when we see pure, undistilled, 100 per cent of his potential. It’s the place of which Ayrton Senna famously and mystically spoke when describing his laps at Monaco in 1988.

Brolin has interviewed many of the sport’s greats, as well as lesser lights and sportspeople from outside motor racing, about the phenomenon and the consistency of the themes is striking. Whether we assign neurological, technical, astrophysical or spiritual explanations to the experience is open for debate. And it would inevitably be a fruitless debate, because of the fundamental intransigence people with expertise in each of those fields tend to have about accepting theories outside their own area of knowledge.

The book doesn’t try to reach a resolution on this, but it does record the views of those who have them. Ironically, it is those with open minds who have ready access to the phenomenon. The only real conclusion the book reaches is that the zone is ‘free to everyone with the correct decoder’; but it ventures no theory on what that decoder is – and is all the better for that.

Brolin took years researching the book and it would be nice if he were rewarded for such dedication to a complex, ultimately unresolved but fascinating subject. Buy it: you’ll have spent a tenner but gained a fascinating insight.
*
Dr Gordon McCabe (McCabism website – Mar 1, 2010
http://mccabism.blogspot.com/2010/03/overdrive-formula-1-in-zone.html)

Overdrive is first and foremost a book about what it is like to be a racing driver ‘in the Zone’. This is the state of mind in which a driver attains mental clarity, he feels at one with the car, and in which driving fast at the very limit feels effortless. This mental state requires the conscious mind to relax its control, and allow the subconscious mind to take over. At times like this, the conscious mind of the driver is able to sit back and observe, from an almost disinterested perspective, the actions of his own body.

It is a unique and fabulous work. The author has extracted a gripping and fascinating collection of lucid recollections from many of the most famous names in motor-sport. Brolin has essentially unearthed a whole world of private experience, which has received little prior attention. The accounts rendered of being in the Zone should be treated as a treasure-trove for psychologists and neuro-scientists, and even the more overtly religious testimonies later in the book can be seen as an interesting anthropological study of the beliefs held by certain modern tribes. Buy it!

Sourced from: www.overdrivef1.com/review.html
*

Overdrive is unlike any motorsport book we’ve read before, focusing as it does solely on the driver’s state of consciousness – as in ‘higher consciousness’, or being ‘in the Zone’.

It begins with the famous story of Ayrton Senna’s 1988 Monaco GP qualifying lap, 1.4 seconds faster than anyone else could manage, after which he claimed to have been undergoing an out-of-body experience, looking down on himself driving the car from above. It’s a great story, backed up by Alain Menu’s gripping eyewitness account.

The episode marked a spiritual awakening for Senna, and had he been alive today, he could doubtless have filled an entire book with other Zonal anecdotes and his thoughtful musings on God and his place in the world. Instead, a supporting cast of numerous other drivers step into the breach. There are some real gems here, from the meditational Andy Priaulx, to the religious Ricardo Zonta, the candid Johnny Herbert or the inspirational Alex Zanardi.

But we felt that some of the other anecdotes of trips to the Zone, however long- or short-lived, don’t add much to the narrative. It’s as if Brolin (an experienced motorsport journalist who writes under a pseudonym) felt the need to include everybody he spoke to on the subject. We’ve no doubt that many more accounts were consigned to Brolin’s Trash folder, but it doesn’t always feel that way, robbing the book of some much-needed pace.

Near the end, there’s also a section on soccer players’ visits to the Zone which, while very interesting at times, seem out of place in this context. So be prepared to skip over a few pages or paras here and there, but for most readers, the unusual insight provided by the likes of Herbert and Priaulx alone will justify your reading the rest of the book.

Review by Graham Heeps
February 2011

If YOU set your heart on it, you can test, challenge and surpass your own “perceived limits” as YOU too “get into your own zone”.

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU …through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life!

Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + totally unmusical motor racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and passion.
True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

” I truly believe we can ALL create and enthuse magic into ‘so-called humdrum little lives’. You don’t just have to be the choreographer, or the conductor of your life script –
rather paint your life as the masterpiece it could (one day) be. There is a rich tapestry of talent in every human soul, that flows through the spirit of God. So don’t spend your
days stringing and tuning your instrument; start making and playing your unique tunes of music right now.”

“Success: how and the spirit with which you face, then overcome the daily obstacles, the frequent trials and tribulations along the
often rocky path-way of life’s magical and mysterious journey. Light your path brightly.”
– craig

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘Inside the Mind of a Grand Prix Champion’, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’ … as well as ‘Driven: Grand Prix Driving on the Edge’ and ‘God and Formula One: Beyond the Zone’

http://www.craiglockbooks.comhttp://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ , as well as the above books) are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the sources, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken another course!

“Sometimes you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you were meant to live.”

The Yellow Helmet

June 15, 2013

http://www.amazon.com/The-Yellow-Helmet-Coloured-Helmets/dp/1490440550

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write”

(including ‘The Winning Mind’ 

and his many books on motor racing and Formula1: ‘Stirling, The Grand Prize

and Inside the Mind of a Grand Prix Driver’* *)

are available at: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 http://www.creativekiwis.com/index.php/books and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children –
MINE!

The Yellow  Helmet is already available in paperback at

http://www.amazon.com/The-Yellow-Helmet-Coloured-Helmets/dp/1490440550

The submitter’s motor racing blogs

(with extracts from his various writings: articles,

books and new manuscripts) are at

http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

https://grandprixchampion.wordpress.com/

http://grandprixdrivermyblog.wordpress.com/

http://godandformula1.wordpress.com/http://www.sportforpeace.wordpress.com and

his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.

Obsessive or WHAT!

“Don’t bend; don’t water it down; don’t try to make it logical; don’t edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.”

~ Franz Kafka

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’

senna (best)

A “Review” of the Book ‘Bounce’: How Champions are Made’ (by Matthew Sayed)

June 13, 2013

Image

Article Title: A “Review” of the Book ‘Bounce’: How Champions are Made’ (by Matthew Sayed)

Shared by: Craig Lock
Category (key words): Books, Bounce, Matthew Sayed. Champions, Success, Success Principles, Motivation, Inspiration, Sports Psychology, Sport, Mind, Mind Control, Positive Thinking and
Positive Psychology (enough there now, craig!)

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

.Obsessive or WHAT!

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

Publishing Guidelines:
We hope that the following article may be informative and helpful to your e-zine readers, or on your web site.
This piece may be freely reproduced electronically or in print. If it helps others “out there” on the pathway to success (and most importantly,
happiness), then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”
* *

A “REVIEW” OF THE BOOK ‘BOUNCE’: HOW CHAMPIONS ARE MADE

by Matthew Sayed, a journalist with the Times of London (and published by a division of Harper Collins)

Sayed maintains that It (success) is not about talent. It’s about the transformational power of practice – the time and immense effort you put in to develop your skills. There is no short-cut to the very top, to become a champion. Practice is transformative, not only for the body… but in the mind.
The psychologist Ericson was right. To develop the complexity of skills takes many thousands of hours.
However, champions also need opportunity (or rather opportunities). Excellence is the consequence of thousands of hours of practice, but champions need skills to translate under pressure.
Belief in God liberated some champions to play great sport. Eg: “With God (or Allah) on my side, I couldn’t lose.”
– Muhammad Ali (and British triple-jumper Jonathan Edwards)

In other words, the ‘placebo effect’ transcends medicine:
“Positive illusion”
Champions also use mental tools, like:
Positive
affirmations
and
Positive imagery

In summary…
Relevant and powerful is perceptual awareness (and not better reactions) that makes the difference in performance between elite
sports-people… and that these skills are acquired, then developed over many years.

Finally…
Matthew Sayed suggests that BELIEF, rather than ability will determine our level of success?? (what do YOU think).The central fundamental theme of this fascinating and compelling book hinges on a word BELIEF – that excellence depends on many hours of practice, rather than our innate abilities.
After all these years a glimmer of hope for me then…
perhaps!

In developing YOUR craft to the fullest with hard work, persistence, patience and especially PRACTICE, discover the champion in YOU!

Shared by Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributor, Incorrigible Encourager and People-builder”)

The greatest mountain we need to climb lies in our our own minds”. It’s not the highest mountain that we conquer, but ourselves, our own mentality. Overcoming perceived limits to reach (attain) the pinnacle of our own minds.”
– craig (as inspired by the words of Sir Edmund Hillary, conquerer of Mount Everest (1919-2008)
“Time after time we are forced to wonder why one great talent succeeds… and another still greater talent falls short? The reason is not mere “the will to win”. Rather it is the will to be tested at the very highest level. It is the ability to not only dwell on the far edge of sporting possibility, but to hold one’s balance…and to relish the proximity of the void.”
-The Times, London
“Champions aren’t made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them: A desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have last-minute stamina, they have to be a little faster, they have to have the skill and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.”
– Muhammad Ali

“One person with a dream can accomplish more than 100 others without one. If you have a burning desire, you can accomplish anything. The biographies of great men and women are full of stories of how they did seemingly impossible things because they had a dream.”
– author unknown

” Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. “
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Oh man! There is no planet sun or star could hold you, if you but knew what you are.”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

” I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have.”
– Abraham Lincoln

About the Submitter:

Craig believes (and loves) in helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE. www.craiglockbooks.comhttp://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ * and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Grand Horizons‘) *) are available at:
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4http://goo.gl/vTpjk and http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

STOP. Enough there now, craig. Your “signature” is already longer than your article!

OK, then I’ll just add a bit to the article

”He who cherishes a beautiful vision, a lofty ideal in his heart, will one day realize it.
Dream lofty
dreams and as you dream so shall you become.”
– James Allen

“No vision and you perish; No Ideal, and you’re lost; Your heart must ever cherish Some faith at any cost. Some hope, some dream to cling to, Some rainbow in the sky, Some melody to sing to, Some service that is high.”
– Harriet Du Autermont

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials.”

THIS ARTICLE MAY BE FREELY PUBLISHED

PPS:
Most importantly,
have FUN enjoying the life journey


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