Archive for the ‘Formula One’ Category

Monaco Grand Prix: Pastor Maldonado arrives in Monaco!

May 21, 2014

Monaco Grand Prix: Pastor Maldonado arrives in Monaco!

Pastor Maldonado arrives in Monaco!
Got this “funny” email, so thought I’d share

Enjoy

PS: Come on Pastor (hope you have a sense of humour!), prove us all wrong and throw some eggs in our faces. Give us a great drive round the streets of the Principality, like you did in Catalunya 2012.
You CAN do it!

“Yet Another Unsafe Release”

May 12, 2014

pastor m

from https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10202947677405853&set=np.26394696.100004434734054

Come on now, Pastor. What’s happening, other than paying heaps of dough for your Lotus drive. And I was so excited when “underdog” you (and Williams) held off Alonso all those laps to win the Spanish GP at Catalunya in 2012!

The Mindset and Spirit of a Champion

April 24, 2014

Happy 54th Birthday Ayrton. Gone but never forgotten from (www.facebook.com)

Happy 54th Birthday Ayrton. Gone but never forgotten!

Ayrton (Japanese GP 1989)

Article Title: The Mindset and Spirit of a Champion

from  http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/the-mind-set-and-spirit-of-a-champion

Shared by: Craig Lock

Category (key words/tags): Champion, motivation, inspiration, mind, mind-power, spirit, empowerment, sport, sport psychology, positive psychology, achievement, peak performance (enough there for now, craig!)

Web sites: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lockhttp://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

https://grandprixchampion.wordpress.com/ http://grandprixdrivermyblog.wordpress.com/ www.raceinthezone.wordpress.com www.godandformula1.wordpress.com http://www.sportforpeace.wordpress.com and his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig

Publishing Guidelines:
We hope that the following article may be informative and helpful to your e-zine readers, or on your web site.
This piece (as with all my articles) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print..
If it helps others “out there” on the pathway to success (and most importantly, happiness), then we’re very happy.

We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”
#

THE MINDSET AND SPIRIT OF A CHAMPION
In this article we’ll look into the heads of the greatest champions… and perhaps we “ordinary” (what’s that) can learn and apply these principles in our own “top two inches”.
Here are a few thoughts on developing the right mindset, mentality to achieve “greatness”in whatever field you may choose.:

So what are the qualities, the traits (nice word that!) of a champion?
To “kick off”, here are the four “D’s” of important, no essential “virtues”:
* DESIRE: True champions have a burning fire within them. One that motivates them and inspires them to “challenge history”.

* DISCIPLINE:
They have a cast-iron determination to work really hard at their craft.
… to be the very best!
Champion sportspeople and athletes work really hard on strength and stamina (fortunately “matchstick-men” writers don’t have to make that sacrifice)

“And in this there is for us mere mortals a sobering humility in the knowledge that they have not just had the gifts, but were prepared to work far beyond the normal physical and mental boundaries to develop them to the full extent of their powers.”
– fine writing by Ian Gillies writing about former All-Black rugby player Ian Kirkpatrick in the Gisborne Herald (web site www.gisborneherald.co.nz/article/?id=17486 )

* DETERMINATION (driving) : to reach the very top in their chosen field.

“He is the embodiment of grit and determination.” (the “will to win”)

* DESPERATION (“God responds to desperation”):

The ability to “dig deep” in the face of severe pressure will produce extraordinary effort.

The Will to win
“He was the epitomy of the Springbok flanker: tough, indomitable and with an outstanding work ethic.”
– South African Rugby Union President Oregan Hoskins on superb Springbok flanker Rueben Kruger, who died aged 39 in January 2010.

Then comes …

* Inspiration (after the work has already begun)
Now let us look at this mental area in a bit more depth…

.
* Champions are intelligent people, who understand themselves – what motivates them and what “presses their hot buttons”. They know what inspires them and apply that knowledge. To do something about HOW to achieve their dreams.

* They possess the ability to compartamentalize their thinking.
A “meticulous mind”, being able to compartamentalize different aspects of their thinking. Like three-time world motor-racing champion Scotsman, Jackie Stewart said, they have great mind management skills.

They have the ability to do things automatically, sub-consciously… which is why they can take in so much information simultaneously and make many instant, “split-second” decisions – in motor racing this is sometimes the difference between life and death.

Champions are mentally strong. With peak physical fitness comes mental strength.
They have very strong
* Mental application to the task at hand.
* Total focus and concentration:
They have a great ability to concentrate, ie. total focus (on the task at hand). Champion racing drivers, like Sebastian Vettel are different from other athletes in that he has the capacity to take control of many things and make numerous split-second decisions in precise time.

A chrystal-clear focus on attaining their objectives (short-medium and long-term), goals and dreams. However, their main focus is on the BIG long-term goals.

* Inner CONFIDENCE. .. and that is why the mental as aspect, the “top two inches” is critical to achievement and peak performance. Just trust the process!

* COURAGE (great)

”It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance. Robert Francis Kennedy quotes (US Democratic politician, Attorney General and Adviser, 19251968)*

Unshakable belief: a passionate conviction in their abilities

Champions can bring out their “best stuff” at the right time, peaking at the biggest events.
“When it ‘comes to the crunch’ on crucial points, he has the ability to raise his game. He has an extra gear and knows, really knows that he is still going to win. “
– Pete Sampras on Roger Federer

* A “cast-iron” will… the “will to win”
When the “chips are down”, true champions possess “true grit”, a fighting spirit to succeed against all the odds.
“Champions are not made in the gym… Champions need both WILL and skill. However, the will must be stronger than the skill.”
– Muhammad Ali

* “A “killer instinct” – the fighting ability to succeed at all costs.
Failure is not something that defines who we are (as it inevitably happens to all of us along life’s journey). Failure is simply temporary occasions we have encountered along the road to eventual success. Failure doesn’t mean that you have failed – it’s just that you haven’t succeeded… YET!

So
FAIL YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!

“Just because you’ve failed doesn’t mean you are a failure”. We learn more from our failures than our successes.

“Failure is a hurdle, but far more importantly, the steppingstone on the path to glorious success.”

– craig

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”
– champion basket-baller, Michael Jordan

You only fail, if you quit!
* Tenacity (a spirit of tenacity in never giving up). Great!
A “champ” is down at times, but ever out!

* Consistency of performance. That is what characterised a person “at the very top of their game”.
They are extremely precise in whatever they do… and when in the zone” they display a “metronomic” consistency in performance.
They easily get into the rhythm, then maintain it for long periods.

* Integrity: Because, if you lose that, you’ve lost everything!
“Life is measured, not in years alone, but in achievement.”
– New Zealand Grand Prix driver, Bruce McLaren, tragically killed in a testing accident in 1970… and a humble, unassuming man of great integrity.

Finally… and most importantly,
Champions have a sense of destiny.
“Champs” love a sense of challenge. They are inspired to test their own boundaries, their personal ceilings… continually.

And YOU too can be a winner in the “game of life”
If you can dream it, then you can DO it.”
Then when you can Do it, you too can BE the champion of your own life!

“Shared by Craig Lock Eagle Productions
(“Information and Inspiration Distributer, Writer for Self Empowerment, Incorrigible Encourager, People-builder and Dreamer”)

“As the artist of your own life, you need a sense of destiny – no one will believe in you, if you can’t believe in yourself…first.”

Then as the Nike dad says,
just DO IT!

Unlock YOUR potential. The sky is the limit!

sports-fanatic couch-pot-ato” craig

“Only when we’ve been in the deepest valley can know what it’s like to stand on the highest peak.”
– I love those inspiring and empowering words from former US President, Richard Nixon

“Greatness is forged in the valleys of adversity and even occasional despair.”

In the midst of difficulties and severe hardship, say “this too shall pass and will work out for my ultimate good”.

“To live your life in your own way
To reach the goals you’ve set for yourself
To be the person you want to be –
That is success.”
– author anon

“There is one only one success: to be able to spend your life in your own way”
– Christopher Morley

“The important thing is this: to be able at any moment to
sacrifice what we are for what we could become.”
– Charles Du Bos

“The roots of true achievement lie in the will to become the best that you can become.”
– Harold Taylor

About the Submitter:
Craig is a “passionate sports-fanatic couch-pot-a-toe/petrol-head”, who has spent much of his life studying the human mind… and especially the mindset and qualities of the greatest champions… those sports-people at the very pinnacle of their games… and their chosen sports.
Craig believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams in life with enough FAITH, COMMITMENT and PERSISTENCE.

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lockhttp://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

“There is no friend as loyal as a book.”

– Ernest Hemingway

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

https://grandprixchampion.wordpress.com/ http://grandprixdrivermyblog.wordpress.com/
http://www.raceinthezone.wordpress.com http://www.godandformula1.wordpress.com
http://www.sportforpeace.wordpress.com and his various other blogs are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstores”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, empower, uplift and encourage to reach their fullest potentials… and become ever more champions of their own lives”

THESE THOUGHTS MAY BE FREELY PUBLISHED

PPS
To dearest dad, “a champ”, see the dream never died. It just took another course!

As Woody Allen once said:
“Life is what happens between making other plans!”

“The empires of the future are the empires of the mind”
– Winston Churchill (in his speech to Harvard University in 1943)

“A champion is not a title, but a set of qualities: Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with dedication, purpose, desire and passion. True champions LIVE the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– me

Ayrton the very limit UK 1983

Ayrton on the very limit (UK 1983)

senna eyes

Picture from http://www.amazon.com/Driven-Grand-Racing-Driving-Limit-ebook/dp/B005WZ0ZSA/

Ayrton Senna – Inside the Mind of a Champion

March 3, 2014

Ayrton Senna – Inside the Mind of a Champion

Ayrton Senna – Inside the Mind of a Champion

  • Tags: Formula 1, sport, sport psychology
  •  
  • Updated: May 24, 2013

I was originally going to write a post just about the power of the placebo effect in sport after watching the film Senna. This led me to watch another documentary about him on YouTube titled “Ayrton Senna: the Right to Win” – full subtitled version at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShPc3nY5m5w

After watching this, I changed my mind. Senna was a near perfect model for the principles of sport psychology. So that will be the focus of this blog instead. He epitomises everything that a champion should be – driven (pardon the pun), determined, dedicated and ‘mentally tough’ with attention to the most trifling details that others overlooked.

The very first few lines of the programme set the scene beautifully. His great rival Alain Prost talks about his insatiable hunger for success. Then Ron Dennis talks about the faith or trust that he had in himself (and in God) to get himself round the track faster than anyone else.

Murray Walker: “He actually believed that he had a God-given right to win.”

Damon Hill tells us a bit more:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECeOQWtIer8

His trust in divine intervention helped him to go faster than he normally could have. Although he was already a great driver the placebo effect of being guided by a higher power enhanced his performance beyond what it would have without religion. This effect is well documented in medicine. If you are told that taking a pill will make you better, it often does regardless of whether it actually has any medicinal effect or not. Placebo groups are often given harmless substances such as sugar pills, and if they are told that they will have an effect, then they often do. This has been the case in many (but not every) study into placebo’s effects on mental illness. If this works for psychological disorders, then why would the same effect not occur in a positive psychological way with people in a performance setting? The placebo in this case was Senna’s unshakable belief that he was fulfilling God’s will. This led him to drive faster and corner more sharply (especially in the wet) than he might have without that belief. The margins between winning and losing in sport at the elite level (and no less in Formula 1) are minute – a tiny fraction of 1%. His faith may have made all the difference, especially when allied to his meticulous preparation.

The introductory section of the film ends with a quote from Senna himself:

“You think you have a limit. As soon as you touch this limit something happens and suddenly you can go a bit further.

With your brain power, your determination, instinct and experience you can fly very high.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPR4Uc1z1q0

Eagle

Picture by the submitter’s old friend John (whose “photographic talents” he definitely does not posess!)

web site http://jetpix.wordpress.com/

This shows us his powerful self-talk and confidence in his ability to extend beyond his own and other’s previous limits.

In a sport with such little margin for error, intricate planning was vital. In an age where drivers prepared less off the track, Senna was obsessed with every tiny detail that could give him even the slightest edge over his rivals – and Prost in particular. He prepared himself better than any other driver ever had before, both physically and mentally. He was an innovator in using a sport psychologist (or physical/mental coach as Nuno Cobra calls himself) before anyone else in F1. He meditated to a very deep level, which I would think involved him using imagery too in some way as the mechanisms between the two techniques (and hypnosis) are very similar. He used techniques to control his breathing and relax when he was becoming over-aroused. He had an excellent understanding of how his body and his mind functioned together. These methods allowed him to concentrate at an almost superhuman level and get into the zone almost at will during races

Gerhard Berger: “Once he was focussed he didn’t feel any pain or stress. Nothing.

He was just in another world. He was a step ahead.

Damon Hill: “There’s a state of mind that one is raised to where it becomes sort of transcendental.

He talked about a state of mind he got into whereby he was there, but not really driving the car”

Prost describes how, after a race at Monaco, Ayrton explains how he monitored his performance during the race itself: he ‘went outside’ of the car and looked how it was behaving on the track, realised where he was going wrong, came back ‘inside’ the car and drove the perfect lap. He managed to visualise from a ‘third person’ perspective (i.e. as if watching from outside) during the race and corrected his mistakes. This also had a negative effect on Prost. Senna effectively ‘psyched him out’ – “he was different”. Its the realisation that whatever he did, Senna was doing something better. He was always ready to take risks to win where others may have played it safe.

Damon Hill recounts seeing Senna spectating at a karting event where Prost was driving. He recalls how Senna studied every detail of Prost’s performance, looking for the slightest weakness he could exploit back in Formula 1. He then utilised this in qualifying, having beaten Prost to pole, he looked relaxed and confident. Prost knew he was done for. Senna could now plot his path to the championship (using goal-setting skills, outcome, performance and process goals to set his course).

Frank Williams: “When Ayrton came along… his approach was cerebral… he used his head at all times… with more dash and determination than you saw with Alain.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jco68lcWN-A

All of the above gives some insight in what it takes to reach the top level in any field. You must first have the necessary physical attributes necessary for your domain (e.g. height, body type – endomorph, ectomorph or mesomorph, muscle fibre types), but then the dedication or obsession to sacrifice other parts of your life in order to be the best. As Ayrton Senna was the first to show in F1, sport psychology (and a belief in a higher power) is also a very powerful tool indeed. To discount it and other areas of academic research as being irrelevant or unrealistic is narrow-minded to say the least. It is the skill of a good practitioner to translate the black and white from journals/papers into real-life, applicable interventions that any athlete*  can use in sport and everyday life. Also, the impact of luck should not be totally disregarded. Ex cricketer Ed Smith has written a book on the subject, counting luck as being almost as important as genetic and environmental factors in winning. Ayrton Senna’s luck was in when it rained at critical points during grands prix. Unfortunately, his luck was ultimately out at Imola, San Marino on that fateful day: 1st May 1994.

my comment: this concept (principle) can apply to (and be applied by) ANY person, whatever their field of endeavour!

Just be the very best you can be. Then you will be (become) the champion of your own life

shared by craig lock (Eagle Productions NZ: “Information and Inspiration Distributors, Incorrigible Encouragers and People-builders”)

“Become the person you are CAPABLE of being … and ALL the person God, Our Creator intended us to become.”

– me

Tags: Formula 1, sport, sport psychology

From http://www.thesportinmind.com/articles/aytron-senna-inside-the-mind-of-a-champion/

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, uplift, empower, encourage and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials.”

Ayrton Senna’s Lap on the Limit (Adelaide 1986)

February 4, 2014

Ayrton Senna’s Lap on the Limit (Adelaide 1986)

Some great footage of Ayrton on the limit, “in the Zone” (as this “total non-techno and world’s worst photographer”) tries to learn about videos, Movie Maker and how to upload. So thought he’d share with fellow “petrol-heads”. Enjoy…

PS: Sorry about the singing drowning out Murray Walker’s commentary, as I experiment “pushing my own non-techno limits”

“the world’s worst photographer and definitely not Steven Spielberg”

The champions of F1 (Part 2)

February 3, 2014

Part 2 of a tribute video to the champions of F1

The champions of F1 (Part 1)

January 30, 2014

A Tribute to Ayrton Senna (21st March 1960 – 1st May 1994): Ayrton ‘In the Zone’ : ‘Senna’ – A Film “Review”

January 21, 2014

Image

Article Title: A Tribute to Ayrton Senna: Ayrton ‘In the Zone’ : ‘Senna’ – A Film “Review”
Submitted by: Craig Lock
Category (key words): Ayrton Senna, Motor racing, motor sport, Grand Prix drivers, film “reviews”, “book reviews”, Formula One, “the zone”, “in the zone”, ‘Racing in the Zone’, ‘FI in the Zone’, Grand Prix racing, sport, success, achievement,
peak performance, mind, mind-power, motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)
Web site:
http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at

(Obsessive…or WHAT!)

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig)

Publishing Guidelines:

All my articles may be freely published. If this article is published, please acknowledge the source, thanks.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

#

.

A TRIBUTE TO AYRTON SENNA: AYRTON ‘IN THE ZONE’

Submitter’s Note:

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION’, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

I came across this great (and well-written) article by a former F1 photographer named Carlos in my research for a book I’m currently writing to be titled ‘Racing in the Zone’ and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’, so am sharing as a tribute to the “late and great” Ayrton Senna. (Thanks, Carlos). So enjoy…

“A lot of people go through life doing things badly. Racing’s important to men who do it well. When you’re racing, it’s life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting.”

– Steve McQueen in the film ‘Le Mans’ (1971)

Racing, competing, he said, it ‘s in my blood. It s part of me, it’s part of my life; I have been doing it all my life and it stands out above everything else.

And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

And suddenly I realized that I was no longer driving the car consciously. I was driving it by a kind of instinct, only I was in a different dimension.”

-The “late great” Ayrton Senna

Ayrton Senna Documentary Wins Top Honours at Sundance Film Festival

From:

http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

Monday, January 31, 2011

Ayrton Senna was the greatest race-car driver of all time. He occupies a singular place at the pinnacle of Formula 1 racing, above the greats of the sport, from Juan Manuel Fangio and Jim Clark to Gilles Villeneuve and Formula 1’s “winningest” champion, Michael Schumacher. In Brazil Ayrton Senna stands shoulder-to-shoulder with Pele, the world s all-time greatest footballer and FIFA s athlete of the century, in legendary stature.

And what a legend he was. Ayrton Senna s awesome talent was off the charts. A racing writer who had considered Gilles Villeneuve to be the best and most spectacular racecar driver ever changed his mind after watching hours of film of Senna’s races. He realized, he said, that Senna was spectacular all of the time. Yesterday, the documentary Senna received top honours in its category at the prestigious Sundance Film Festival. Here is a review. It seems to be an exceptional film about an exceptional man.

Ayrton Senna pushed the envelope to its very limit. He redefined pushing the envelope. He stepped outside it and took one, two, three a four steps beyond where anyone had ever gone. Or could go. It’s been said there is no more intense human activity short of war than Formula 1 racing. Or at least the Formula 1 racing of the 80s and 90’s, when Senna reigned supreme over rivals Nigel Mansell, Alain Prost, and fellow countryman Nelson Piquet.

There was one memorable confrontation between Ayrton Senna and Nelson Piquet during the Hungarian Grand Prix that recalled that famous scene in ‘Rebel Without a Cause’ in which the two rivals play a game of chicken by drag racing to the edge of a precipice. Whoever brakes first “chickens out” and loses the game. Piquet was in the lead going into the straightaway with Senna fast on his tail.

Nelson Piquet had the better team, the better car, Williams, and was vying for the World Driving Championship, which he would go on to win that year. Senna was the “young gun” driving for Lotus, the legendary team of hat-tossing Colin Chapman. Lotus had seen better days with another famous Brazilian racer, Emerson Fittipaldi, and then Mario Andretti at the wheel, as they steered its striking John Player Special black-and-gold cars to World Driving and Constructors Championships.

As Senna zoomed up behind Piquet, drafting and dancing in his mirrors, which did not faze the unflappable Piquet, famous for having the lowest heart rate in the drivers community and snoozing in his car during a race start delay – he was piloting an inferior Lotus race-car, which had won its last Grand Prix races, back-to-back, earlier that year at Monaco and Detroit, owing to Senna s prodigious talent.

They raced down the straightaway flat-out, sparks flying as the cars bottomed out on the rough Hungarian track. Piquet had the lead and the inside line. Then Senna made his move. He swung outside and pulled up alongside Piquet. They were racing wheel-to-wheel toward a hard-braking sharp right-hand turn at the end of the straightaway. Senna was supremely confident of his ability to outbrake anyone going into a turn and still maintain control of the car. Piquet knew it. He knew that if he braked too soon, he would be overtaken by Senna. Too late and he would be forced to over-compensate, losing his line and taking a wide outside turn. He knew Senna would shoot the inside gap and have him, either way. So Piquet took the only option left to retain the lead. He dived into the corner, “hot” braking (ever so) late and hard, going into a controlled skid. Piquet’s rear end waggled momentarily; but then his tires gripped asphalt and accelerated out, holding his line, with Senna’s black Lotus boring in and riding up his tail.

It was racing in its purest form. Nelson Piquet had the better car, yet had to summon every trick in his arsenal to hold off the hard-charging Ayrton Senna. It was a risky manoeuvre, but it probably saved Piquet the championship. I remember thinking, ‘Yo Senna, cut your compadre a break; he s got enough troubles handling teammate Nigel Mansell without you giving him a hard time’.

But that’s not how Ayrton Senna thought. He finished second that day, behind Piquet, and looked none too happy about it. Senna once said about losing: “Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.”

Senna had many memorable quotes:

Racing, competing, he said, it ‘s in my blood. It s part of me, it’s part of my life; I have been doing it all my life and it stands out above everything else.

And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high.

And suddenly I realized that I was no longer driving the car consciously. I was driving it by a kind of instinct, only I was in a different dimension.”

(His famous words on qualifying at Monaco in 1988, when he was almost in a zen-like state and almost an unheard of 2 seconds faster than his nearest and bitterest rival)

Having seen Ayrton Senna drive at the peak of his Zen-like performance, it once occurred to me that the phrase ‘in the zone’ could have been conjured up with him in mind. After several unsuccessful attempts to capture this ethereal quality, because he was too fast for my camera’s shutter, I think I got close with this shot of Senna on his way to winning the 1988 Canadian Grand Prix in Montreal. It’s not a camera trick or Photoshop. Everything around him is a speed blur. But Senna’s famous red and white McLaren stands out in high relief, as if floating within a bubble of calm. Not too bad for an amateur photographer!

That was Ayrton Senna ‘in the zone’. Some of those performances were so amazing that he’d take the lead and keep increasing it until he had lapped almost the entire field and was nearly a minute ahead of his closest competitor. That is unheard of. Senna lost a few races this way, such that once having eliminated his competition early, he raced against himself trying to top his own personal best. With fewer than ten laps remaining, he didn t fail, but his car sometimes did, breaking down mechanically. It was frustrating to think that if only he’d eased off, he could have coasted to victory. But that wasn’t Ayrton Senna.

On compromise, this is what the uncompromising Ayrton Senna had to say: “You must take the compromise to win, or else nothing. That means: you race or you do not. (President Obama must have channeled Senna, when he was criticized for compromising on taxes with the Republicans.)

Ayrton Senna had a sense of fatalism about how he lived his life. Four months before his death, he said: “If I m going to live, I want to live fully. Very intensely, because I am an intense person. It would ruin my life if I had to live partially.”

Posted by Carlos at Monday, January 31, 2011

From:

http://thinkingorsitting.blogspot.com/2011/01/ayrton-senna-documentary-wins-top.html

Thanks for sharing a great piece of writing, Carlos…. which in turn, I’m passing on…

craig (another passionate F1 fan)

If YOU set your heart on it, you can test, challenge and surpass your own “perceived limits” as YOU too “get into your own zone”.

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU …through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life!

Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + totally unmusical motor racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and passion.
True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

” I truly believe we can ALL create and enthuse magic into ‘so-called humdrum little lives’. You don’t just have to be the choreographer, or the conductor of your life script –
rather paint your life as the masterpiece it could (one day) be. There is a rich tapestry of talent in every human soul, that flows through the spirit of God. So don’t spend your
days stringing and tuning your instrument; start making and playing your unique tunes of music right now.”

“Success: how and the spirit with which you face, then overcome the daily obstacles, the frequent trials and tribulations along the
often rocky path-way of life’s magical and mysterious journey. Light your path brightly.”
– craig

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.
Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of ‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

He’s also currently writing a new book to be titled ‘Racing in the Zone’ and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’. Obsessive or WHAT!!!

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lockhttp://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk


The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at

(Obsessive…or WHAT!)

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the source web site, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken another course!

“Sometimes you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you were meant to live.”

“I want to write the way Gilles Villeneuve drove and power-slid his blood-red Formula One Ferrari… with wild enthusiasm and a sense of abandonment, combined with the artists craft of a Stirling Moss, a Jim Clark, and especially that of the great Ayrton Senna, living on the razor-blade edge of life.”
for dearest mom and dad, your spirits lives on (forever)
thanks for all the support, encouragement and especially love
“All the world will be happier and better, when the men and women have the souls of artists,, like that of an Ayrton Senna.
– craig (as inspired by Rodin’s famous words)
PPS
Life at the Limit’: A Tribute (Short) to the “Late Great” Ayrton Senna

The Mind, the “Top Two Inches” of the Great Grand Prix Drivers

January 9, 2014

Image

Article Title: The Mind, the “Top Two Inches” of the Great Grand Prix Drivers

Submitted by Craig Lock
Key Words: Motor racing, sport, elite performance, champion, champions, Formula 1, great racing drivers, racing drivers, champion drivers, Grand Prix drivers, Grand Prix champions, Formula One champions/drivers, mind, mind-power, “the zone”, success, success principles,
achievement , excellence (enough there now, craig!)

Submitter’s web sites: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

his various other blogs at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.
(Obsessive…or WHAT!)

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig!)

Publishing Guidelines:

This piece (as with all my writings) may be freely reproduced electronically or in print. If it helps and/or encourages others “out there” along the ‘amazing journey of life’, then we’re very happy.

“We share what we know, so that we all may grow.”

#

THE MIND (MINDSET) OF A GRAND PRIX DRIVER

“It’s like a cure for everything. It doesn’t matter what problems you have – financial, in your personal life – and it doesn’t matter, if you feel really ill. All that goes away and only you sitting in this protective cell, this cockpit remains. I have never felt anything like this in any other way and only driving at the limit gives it to you.”

– former Swedish Ferrari F1 driver, Stefan Johansson from ‘Inside the Mind of a Grand Prix Driver’ , a most interesting (and fascinating at least to me!) book that I’m currently reading and researching

Submitter’s Note

Here are some of my notes from research into many books about the very best Grand Prix drivers (of all time). Other (many and varied) sources are from racing magazines, newspaper cuttings with quotes from drivers, many unknown .Enjoy my shared “true labour of passion and love”.

craig

*

Does the racing driver think in a different way from us “ordinary people”?

They are not like you and I…yet we can ALL learn from them at the very pinnacle of achievement…

GREAT GRAND PRIX DRIVERS ALL have:

* Great DESIRE and passion

“I think of all drivers as pie charts. That can be determination, sheer natural talent, technical understanding, PR, personality, whatever. You can have massive reserves of natural talent; but it’s the hunger, it’s the need, that’s the dividing factor.”

“I realised the thing which made me tick was the winning.”

The desire to win is very powerful. It starts as a hobby that they become very good at, and then it becomes a profession.

You have the desire and the passion.

Those who lack mental resilience fall away.

The struggle is a measure of the driver’s desire.

“I think of all drivers as pie charts. That can be determination, sheer natural talent, technical understanding, PR, personality, whatever. You can have massive reserves of natural talent; but it’s the hunger, it’s the need, that’s the dividing factor.”

How much do you want this?

“And if you don’t want it that much, you’re automatically eliminated.”

* Excellent mind-management skills

“This was the reason why I was so strong in my head. There was no mystery: you can do it. But how you prepare your brain and yourself to do this all the time, that I still don’t know.”

“In his mind he was so strong. Ayrton had the invincibility in a slightly different way, because he was religious and he was protected by God.”

– Johnny Herbert

* A rigid self belief – no doubting one’s self.

“Before you believe in anything, you have to believe in yourself.”

“Every driver believes he is the best.”

* Sheer “bloody-minded” determination.

* Confidence (huge doses of it – absolute belief in themselves and their abilities)

“It’s a confidence (inner) that you have, you trust yourself…and your abilities.”

You compare yourself to the best, don’t you? You compare yourself with someone like Senna, who had the ultimate self belief all the time.”

They are:

* Very strong mentally, ie they possess mental resilience

“The great drivers had mental strength from the beginning. They brought it with them.”

Mental resilience is what Senna had + rigid self belief. Self doubt was what he did not have!

* They are committed (totally) to their endeavour

“Racing is the most ruthless examination of all the sports I have come across. It’s not about learning, say, to play tennis with a homemade racket; it’s about a total commitment – mental, physical, financial – from the earliest moments. And it finds out the people who won’t make that commitment.”

– the words of former F1 driver, Dr Jonathan Palmer (from Inside the Mind of the Grand Prix Driver by Christopher Hilton (Haynes Publishing, first published 2001)

“I discovered that overtaking is about a mental thing. If I can beat you mentally, I can beat you physically and you’ve had it.”

-Senna

They:

* Concentrate superbly… intensely

“A strong mind and vision in which we see things, the clarity during high pressure situations… and this is what makes some Grand Prix drivers better than others, and makes some of them absolute legends, like Schumacher, Prost, Senna – is that they can take more in… The capacity of Ayrton Senna was obviously only 100%, but he just needed 95% of that to drive his car at 100%; so he always had 5% left to look at the tyres, the strategy, the overtaking – everything you need to be able to do to be exceptional.”

* All leading drivers have a great attention to detail – things must be “just right”… even perfect

* Visualise the flying qualifying lap ahead (whilst in the pits) and the start, whilst sitting on the starting line

“If your brain is strong enough and your concentration is good enough, you do the lap time first in your brain … and then in your car and in your body. That is something the good drivers can do, but only Ayrton Senna made perfect.”

– the words of Karl Wendlinger, former Sauber Grand Prix driver

* they are deeply focussed sportsmen, so focus totally at the task at hand

* Compartamentalise their lives; so that they can isolate the various compartments to (in) their daily lives

“Senna’s mind truly was arranged into a series of compartments and he could isolate them, as required.”

“Ayrton got in his car, went out and set his fastest lap ever round Jerez, even though 20 minutes beforehand he had seen me struggling for my life. He was able to pull his visor down and blank that out of his mind. Then he went to the Press Conference, as he had to do, and then he went to the medical centre to see if I was all right.”

– Martin Donnelly (severely injured after a crash at Jerez, Spain in 1990, which led to his retirement from the sport)

and

* Continually challenge their abilities, their unique talents

* Push the boundaries of their abilities a bit further than what seems possible (continually).

and

there are no limits in performance, so they are driven to the very highest standards… to perfection

*

A few final thoughts to end off…

WORK is a four letter word. Talent in itself is not sufficient to rise to the pinnacle of success. True champions work really hard (“their butts off”) in developing their abilities to the absolute fullest.

Fulfil YOUR (unique) potential (or as Abraham Maslow called it, “self actualisation”).

BECOME ALL THAT YOU ARE CAPABLE OF BEING

If YOU set your heart on it, YOU too can became a champion…

and reach NEW HORIZONS in your own life

Reach for the stars and discover the champion of life in YOU through playing your own brand of music on the magical journey of life.

Shared by Craig Lock (“Information and Inspiration Distributer + motor-racing fanatic and petrol-head”)

“Success is doing the best you can, in as many ways as you can.
It is being just and honest and true – not in a few things,
but in everything you do.

About the submitter:
Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a “passionate petrol-head”), who believes in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest” dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion, and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

http://members.tripod.com/~lock77/www.craiglockbooks.com and www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including ‘The Winning Mind’ and and ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great Horizons’) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

Craig’s new e-book ‘The Winning Way’ is at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WQSGEI.

The submitter’s motor racing blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://grandprixdriver.wordpress.com

his various other blogs at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.
(Obsessive…or WHAT!)

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with purpose, desire and
passion. True champions live the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

“A champion is not a title, but a set of qualities: Champions aren’t made in the gym. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – an inner flame that burns brightly…with dedication, purpose, desire and passion. True champions LIVE the dream, the vision of who and what they can one day become…. even a long time before it happens.”
– craig

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their
fullest potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

schumacher

 

 

Fight hard and get well soon, Schumi!

Craig’s Books

January 2, 2014

Craig’s Books

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including his various books on motor racing, Formula 1 and the great Grand Prix drivers) are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock&sort=relevance&ie=UTF8&qid and http://goo.gl/vTpjk