FORMULA ONE IN THE ZONE ( from OVERDRIVE news – Part Two)

FORMULA ONE IN THE ZONE ( from OVERDRIVE news- Part Two)

Web site: http://overdrivef1.com/news.html

Shared with permission (thanks Clyde and Overdrive)

Category (tags, key
words): Overdrive, Clyde Brolin, Ayrton Senna, Motor racing, motor sport, Grand
Prix drivers, fil “reviews”, “book reviews”, Formula One, “the zone”,
“in the zone”, ‘Racing in the Zone’, ‘FI in the Zone’, Grand Prix
racing, sport, success, achievement, peak performance, mind, mind-power,
motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)

Submitter’s note:

The layout on this blog is not nearly as good
(“professional”) as on the above web site; however I am able to “bolden” what I feel to be key points on racing ‘in the zone.’ (Makes them stand
out). Thanks for the understanding
!

Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY!!!

craig
#

“The pleasure comes from feeling you’re at the limit.
When you keep it there for an entire lap or the entire race, that’s the thrill
of racing.”

– multiple World Champion, Michael Schumacher

“If you are in the flow and everything is right, then
you feel it. I know that I am able to do this, but I know you have to pull it
in the right moment of time and that success rate is not yet 100 per
cent.”

– “Schuey” (again)

“You get to the stage when your almost looking down on
yourself. When you get into that state, it’s the best feeling you can
have.”

– Stirling Moss (probably the best driver never to have won
the World Championship and the writer’s boyhood hero)

“A human being is an incredible machine, totally
undiscovered in many ways. Every one of us has a hidden tank of energy that
comes out when it’s really needed.”

– Alex Zanardi (former Indycar driver, who lost both legs in
a high-speed accident. Alex now courageously drives production cars, specially
adapted, in Europe)

“The best thing is when everything is natural and
everything flows. It doesn’t happen all of the time, but only on certain special
occasions.”

– Valentino Rossi, multiple motor-cycle World Champion

“Normally I can recall every detail, but on some of my
best laps sometimes there’s such a rush that I don’t remember anything
afterwards.

– Jensen Button (2009 World Drivers Champion)

“When you’re really on it everything flows. That’s the
best feeling in driving and it’s why you do it. It doesn’t happen all of the
time, but only on special occasions.”

– Sebastian Vettel (World Champion in 2010 and 2011)

“You arrive at a point where you feel you’re not in a
Formula 1 car but a Scalextric. Winning a world championship leads to
recognition and is good for self-confidence, but inside your heart and your
mind this feeling is better.”

– Fernando Alonso (double World Champion in 2005 and 2006??)

from http://www.overdrivef1.com/

#                     #

Sebastian Vettel may have another pole position in the bag,
but for his countryman to block everything out and make the top ten in Valencia
is mighty impressive.
#

Button’s been to the Zone before…

Jenson Button s win from the back of the field in the 2011
Canadian Grand Prix is an instant F1 classic. As he described it: “It’s
definitely my best race: a very special race to win from where I was and I will
remember this for a long time.”

But it is not the first time Button has found the Zone in
a  F1 car. In ‘Overdrive: Formula 1 in the Zone’, he describes the motor
racing equivalent of a cricketer or baseball hitter seeing the ball as big as a
football often in qualifying
. But even when he was struggling in lesser
machinery, many of his greatest moments came in wet/dry conditions similar to
yesterday in Montreal.

One eerily familiar-sounding experience came at the 2007
European GP, when a heavy shower just before the off meant most drivers had no
chance to change their dry tyres. Button was 19th at the first corner, only to
surge up to 4th in a stunning first two laps.

“That was strange, says Button. I don’t know why I was
so much quicker but I was. I had nothing to lose and at every corner I just passed
two or three cars. It felt like everyone else was in slow motion. Maybe people
were being a bit cautious,  I don t know.
The first couple of corners were important for getting heat into the tyres and
maybe I was able to do that better  than
other people. But it was a great event.”

Pity this great event only lasted until lap three, when
Button joined a bunch of cars in the wall after aquaplaning off at the first
corner. The end result had been rather more glorious at Hungary a year earlier,
when unseasonal rain helped him to his first win.

“The race conditions were similar, he adds. But it wasn’t
just those two races that I was quick and that I felt good. It was just that
other people weren’t performing as I was, I suppose. It was similar at Shanghai
in 2007. When we all put slick tyres on,  I was just able to do well.  I don’t know why, it was quite strange. It’s a
great feeling to perform like that, especially when the car is not competitive.
But it’s not crossing the line in fifth place that s exciting,  it’s the moves,  it’s the passing people.”

That  fifth place
reference was prescient, as Button also found this magical feeling on the day
he secured his world title with that position in Brazil. When, like yesterday,
passing people has the additional benefit of a victory, there is no greater
feeling in a racing car.
#

Button on fire in the wet

Jenson Button produced ‘the best’ race of his life to take a
scarcely believable win in the Canadian Grand Prix, despite having dropped to
the back of the field after a series of incidents early in the race.

Following a string of setbacks including clashes with
team-mate Lewis Hamilton and Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, Button found a level of
performance that blew the rest of the field away. In wet/dry conditions where
he has long been the master, he made full use of a late safety car period
before passing Michael Schumacher, Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel in quick
succession in the dying moments.

A stunning win. Was he in the Zone? You bet…
#

Imperious Vettel run continues

The order on the grid has changed – a bit – for the Canadian
Grand Prix, with the Ferraris occupying P2 and P3 on the grid.

But the all-important man sitting at the front hasn’t
changed. Sebastian Vettel continues to demonstrate the majestic form of a world
champion with all the confidence that title brings.

Vettel has had two big crashes already this year, but the
difference to previous years is that they have come in free practice. He
recovered to win after the last one and now he’s in the best position to repeat
the feat in Montreal.
#

Mark Webber takes a stand

With the subject of a 2011 reinstatement of the Bahrain Grand
Prix still on the agenda, Mark Webber
has been the first current F1 figure of any kind to point out the moral, rather
than expedient, element to the decision.

“When people in a country are being hurt, the issues are bigger
than sport
,”  he tweeted under
his tag AussieGrit. “Let’s hope the
right decision is made…”

In the week of the Senna movie premiere in the UK, it is apt
that a driver should be the one with the guts to show the ‘bigwigs’ the way on
humanity in global affairs.

1996 world champion Damon Hill made his own point to the
Daily Mail: “F1 must align itself with progression, not repression, and a lot
of demonstrations in that country have been brutally repressed. You are either
aware of that or you’re not.”

#

Vettel makes his own luck as Hamilton self-destructs

Sebastian Vettel held on for victory at Monaco – and all
despite being given the wrong tyres at his pit stop, due to a pair of
fortuitously-timed safety car interruptions.

Vettel held off the charging Fernando Alonso and Jenson
Button but the race was denied a grandstand finish by a red flag due to a crash
involving Vitaly Petrov.

By contrast with the immaculate driving of the top three,
Lewis Hamilton endured a bitterly frustrating weekend on the principality’s
streets. To make matters worse, he let fly after the race with accusations that
he is being victimised by race stewards.

A far cry from his stunning win in 2008 when he found ‘the
Zone’ and shone…

#

Perez escapes heavy shunt

Sauber’s Sergio Perez had a lucky escape from a major crash
at the chicane during qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix.

The young Mexican had been on strong form throughout the
weekend and he was on his flying lap in Q3 when he got out of shape and slid
helplessly into the barriers. There was alarm when he failed to get out of the
car; but the latest reports suggest he has suffered only concussion and a
sprained thigh.
#

Vettel and Hamilton in another league

Formula 1 is going through a vintage period, with half a
dozen superstar drivers at the top of their game. But today’s Spanish Grand
Prix showed that two of them have the potential to ease away from the rest.

Sebastian Vettel and Lewis Hamilton have both shown their
ability to find ‘the Zone’ on numerous occasions in their short careers so far.
Moreover, both should have their best years and their best performances ahead
of them. If they can both stay in competitive machinery then we could see many
more classic duels like today’s.

#

Alonso finds the Zone

No wonder Fernando Alonso was whooping like a child on his
in-lap after qualifying 4th for the Spanish GP: it seems he found the Zone out
there today…

“I did a perfect
lap,” he was quoted by Autosport. “I reckon that if I tried to repeat
it twenty times, I could not do better! When you do a lap like that, it’s hard
to put into words what one feels: always being on the limit, in every corner is
a really special feeling for a driver.”

In Overdrive Alonso goes into detail about what the Zone
feels like: “You arrive at a point
where you feel you’re not in a Formula 1 car but a Scalextric. Winning a world
championship leads to recognition and is good for self-confidence, but inside
your heart and your mind this feeling is better.”

#

Webber on pole at last

Mark Webber finally earned a psychological lift over his
team-mate Sebastian Vettel by taking pole position for the Spanish Grand Prix.

Vettel will start second for the first time in 2011, two
tenths adrift, though he did not have his KERS working in Q3. Lewis Hamilton
took third for McLaren, ahead of charging home star Fernando Alonso, who was
delighted with his lap to split the McLarens in 4th.

#

Schumacher still seeking ‘the flow’

Michael Schumacher is still holding out hope that he can
regain the once-routine, now elusive ‘flow’
that marks out the greatest moments a sportsman can enjoy.

Speaking in a press briefing for this weekend’s Spanish
Grand Prix, the German acknowledged that he cannot afford to make the kind of
elementary errors that sent him ‘over the edge’ in Turkey. But he still
believes he has what it takes to find the magical feeling of the limit.

“If you are in
the flow and everything is right, then you feel it,” Schumacher was quoted
by Autosport. “I know that I am able to do this, but I know you have to
pull it in the right moment of time and that success rate is not yet 100 per
cent.”

No kidding, but Schumacher showed glimpses of his old self
during free practice in Turkey and with Mercedes on the up, it would be a brave
man to bet against him pulling out something special and finding that flow now
he is firmly established as the underdog.

#

Sporting success owed to joy

Fun is underrated in the life of a sportsman. We know they
have to spend decades fighting and working their way to the top of their
profession; but without happiness prompting it all, the rest just wouldn’t
follow.
*              *

In Overdrive, John Surtees spoke of what made Michael
Schumacher so special first time around: “It’s vital to do something in
your life that gives you a kick and that you actually enjoy apart from the
payday. Someone like Schumacher analyses everything very carefully, but
the important thing is that he is actually enjoying himself. He has a
sparkle.”

Schumacher’s comments after his eventful Turkish Grand Prix
about not finding the same big joy out there indicate that sparkle may be
fading at last.

#

Overdrive shortlisted for British Sports Book Awards

‘Overdrive: Formula 1’ in the Zone has made the shortlist
for the British Sports Book Awards to be held on May 9, 2011 at London’s Savoy
Hotel.

Author Clyde Brolin is one of six in the shortlist for the
Best New Writer award – along with Steve Bunce, Matthew Syed, Mike Perham,
Daniel Harris and Neil Clack.

See http://www.britishsportsbookawards.co.uk/book/byhierarchy/11/237

#

A tale of three Germans

Today’s qualifying for the Turkish Grand Prix boiled down to
the performances of three German drivers.

Sebastian Vettel romped to his 4th pole of the season, despite
missing most of yesterday’s practice after crashing out. But it was the pace of
the Mercedes that caught the eye. The team showed a lot of promise in Barcelona
testing; but had yet to fulfil it, until Nico Rosberg’s 3rd place on the
Istanbul grid.

More alarming, though, is the failure of Michael Schumacher
to capitalise on what is clearly an improving car. He was out-shined yet again
by his younger team-mate, this time to the tune of more than a second.
#

Overdrive as a ‘haiku’

In the spirit of David Bader’s ‘One Hundred Great Books in
Haiku’, here’s ‘Overdrive: Formula 1’ in the Zone in rather briefer form:

Out of his body,

Senna flew round Monaco.

He was not alone…

#

Hamilton wins stunning Chinese GP

Lewis Hamilton stormed to victory in a thrilling Grand Prix
at Shanghai today. The Briton kept up his record of winning a race in each of
his seasons in the sport with a trademark battle through the field. Afterwards
a delighted Hamilton described himself as feeling “blessed”, adding: “This race is in my top three of race
wins – it’s up there with Silverstone and Monaco in 2008.”

Sebastian Vettel had no answer on his two-stop strategy; but
held on for second, while his Red Bull team-mate Mark Webber looked every bit
as much ‘in the Zone’as Hamilton, as he made it up from 18th to the podium.

#

Cool Vettel stretches lead

Sebastian Vettel is starting to develop an invincible aura
after his second straight victory at today’s Malaysian Grand Prix. On the
slowing down lap he praised the ‘cool heads’ of the team in the hot conditions
and he showed them the way. That coolness under pressure is what ‘the Zone’ is
all about.

Jenson Button and Nick Heidfeld were both delighted to be on
the podium, gaining momentum back over the respective team-mates since
Australia.

#

Hamilton finds the edge to press Vettel

Lewis Hamilton produced a near-immaculate lap to close to
within a tenth of pole man Sebastian Vettel in qualifying for the Malaysian
Grand Prix. With their team-mates in line astern behind them and the
ever-present threat of serious rain at Sepang, it means Sunday’s race is
beautifully poised.

“That was an almost perfect lap,” said Hamilton.
“I lost a tenth-and-a-half in Turn 14, so we’re much closer to the front
than we’d anticipated.”

If Hamilton can keep it up, it will be good news for the
Formula 1 season ahead, which is shaping up for a battle royal between Red Bull
and McLaren.
#

Team order restored

The Australian Grand Prix was a chance for the lead drivers
from the top teams to assert themselves early in the season.

Sebastian Vettel took the win, destroying team-mate Mark
Webber in the process. Lewis Hamilton’s second place was a similarly strong
performance, while Jenson Button struggled in traffic behind. Then there was
Fernando Alonso, who was ushered past Felipe Massa within seconds of catching
him on track in this new era of freedom with team orders. While both Mercedes
dropped out, Renault’s Vitaly Petrov (pictured) was the star of the show,
taking a deserved podium.
#

Vettel on fire Down Under

Sebastian Vettel produced the dominant performance of a
champion brimming with confidence in the first qualifying session of the year
to take pole by three quarters of a second.

Last year he told me his Melbourne pole was his favourite of
all, even though he admitted he’d screwed up the last corner (see story below).
This year it seemed he went one better – an ominous sign for the rest. Lewis Hamilton
has every right to his delight at McLaren’s turnaround after taking second
place, but many will already be scratching their heads.

#

Good news at the top

After their winter struggles, McLaren showed they had made
progress by taking a one-two for Jenson Button (pictured) and Lewis Hamilton in
Friday’s second practice for the Australian Grand Prix – though Red Bull
dominated in the morning.

The times have to be taken with a barrow-load of salt,
because the big teams were only doing race work – and in recent years McLaren
have often flattered to deceive on Fridays. Still, it shows that they will be
closer to the front than they would have dared dream, as they manhandled their
car round Barcelona earlier this month. They could yet mount a challenge to
favourites Red Bull.

#

Schumacher jumps up the order

Mercedes finally started work with its definitive package
today at Barcelona and Michael Schumacher immediately showed the team mean
business, recording a best lap of 1m 21.268s, the fastest of the winter –
albeit during a qualifying simulation.

At the previous test Mercedes were not hiding their
problems, which included an overheating exhaust. But if they can make this new
package reliable, they could be firmly in the Melbourne mix.

#

Red Bull and Ferrari on song

With the final pre-season F1 test under way at Barcelona,
the apparent formbook – for what it’s worth amid the winter smoke and mirrors –
remains unchanged. Red Bull continue to set the best headline times while
Ferrari look strong over long runs.

Unless one of the other teams comes up with a radical
overhaul by the time the freight leaves for Melbourne – Mercedes have, for
example, promised a new package this week – the sensible money has to be on
2010’s usual suspects.
#

Get well soon JYS

Best wishes go to Jackie Stewart, who was taken ill
suffering from chest pains on a flight from Geneva to London today. His son
Paul has spoken to him and reports all seems well, so fingers crossed.

Jackie is one of the major contributors to Overdrive and the
font of much wisdom, as the winner of three F1 world championships. Here’s a
sample quote from him on how the true greats operate… “Many sportsmen experience the Zone once or twice a year. But
somebody really good can create that on a regular basis and not have to wait
for that day.”

#

McLaren most in need of delay

The belated removal of Bahrain from the F1 calendar means
that teams have much more time to prepare for the first race, now the
Australian Grand Prix on March 27.

Of all the teams in Barcelona that will have been most
welcomed by McLaren, for whom both Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton struggled
this week. Button had his running regularly curtailed by technical problems,
while Hamilton (pictured) found it hard to get his tyres to last. With Ferrari
and Red Bull piling on the mileage and looking quick, McLaren need every extra
second they can find.
#

F1 misses the boat

Formula 1 personnel pride themselves on their ability to
make quick decisions to stay at the top of their game. Yet when the one obvious
big decision comes along it passes everyone by.

Last night Red Bull boss, Christian Horner (pictured) had to
face the press on behalf of the teams to say they would wait for their lead from
the FOM and the FIA about whether or not to travel to Bahrain.

The equipment has to leave by February 25 and no doubt there
are all manner of complicated clauses in contracts to obey. But the chance to
make a simple moral statement by doing the decent thing has now passed.

#

Vitantonio Liuzzi on his Hispania return

How important is it to you to be on the F1 grid?

I’m a driver, I love to race. And it s difficult to stay
away from the race and the grid. But you have to find the best environment for
yourself. I think the plans in this team are good and they can make a step
forward.

What did you make of the clamour to get you back into the
sport when you parted ways with Force India?

Of course I was happy that a lot of people in the paddock,
who know this business realise and understand what my potential is. But not
everyone agrees. We know that F1 is a difficult business, where there is sport,
politics, all these other things…and we have to be strong in all these parts.
At the moment my biggest strength is the sporting side, not the others. But
I’ll keep fighting and hope to get a winning car in the future.

How did you feel, when Robert Kubica said you would have
been his choice as substitute for the Renault seat?

It was a great feeling, because all the drivers in the
paddock know what each other’s level is. And fortunately from the driving side,
I’ve always had big support. But F1 is a business, where it’s not just the
skill, it’s a lot of other things, and we have to accept it. Robert has been
great to me, and I just hope that he can recover as soon as possible and get
back in that seat …because he deserves it.
#

Bahrain GP in doubt

The powers-that-be normally ensure that the Formula 1
paddock is immune from the real world and its ‘inconvenient’ problems – but the
tragic events unfolding in Bahrain have put a stop to that.

This weekend’s GP2 race has been cancelled, throwing the
imminent F1 test and race into doubt. It would be nice to imagine any decision
would be taken on moral, rather than expedient grounds. But given ‘previous’
rumblings, perhaps it’s wiser not to raise such hopes.
#

Heidfeld finds another way back

Nick Heidfeld has never been the flavour of the month in F1
circles, which is why he so regularly finds himself having to force his way
back in via shootouts for race seats. It is nearly a decade since I sat with
him at a dark Jerez as he tried to convince Jordan to employ him.

This year it’s Renault – and he seems to have done the job
at Jerez again with the fastest time on day three of the test. If so, it would
be the deserved fruit of his unrelenting pursuit of a dream. Let’s not forget
he has eight second places in F1, including Canada in 2008, when he moved over
early on for the eventual winner – and then BMW team-mate – Robert Kubica.

#

Kubica recovery could take a year

Surgeons have spent seven hours battling to save Robert
Kubica’s right hand, after he suffered a heavy crash during a rally in Italy. A
guard-rail is believed to have come through the footwell of Kubica’s Skoda,
leaving him with fractures to his right leg and arm. But it was the hand that
caused the most concern due to problems with the blood supply.

At the end of the operation doctors remained cautious,
saying it would be a week before further judgement could be taken on the
success of the procedure. If it has worked, the hand itself will nevertheless
take a year to recover.

Kubica has long lived in Italy to work alongside Dr Riccardo Ceccarelli (left), one of
the most experienced doctors in F1. Ceccarelli is alongside Kubica, while hand
specialist Professor Igor Rosello
led the surgical team.
#

Robert Kubica crashes heavily on Italian rally

Robert Kubica’s hopes of the 2011 F1 title appear over after
he suffered a heavy crash during an Italian rally this morning. Full details
have not yet been released from the hospital; but the Polish driver is reported
to have suffered injuries to his right hand, arm and leg, that will rule him
out for the foreseeable future.

The Renault team, sponsored by Lotus, has taken an
aggressive approach to its design this year and Kubica even set the best lap
time of the Valencia test. The news leaves Bruno Senna in pole position to
inherit the drive.
#

Pirelli good for telly?

While there’s never much point in analysing headline lap
times at the early winter tests, one development already looks interesting.
Over long runs the times rapidly get worse, due to the degradation of the new
Pirelli tyres.

It’s cold in Valencia, so not entirely representative; but
if this continues, be prepared for multiple pit stops during the races in 2011.
Deliberate or not, it could be good for the show.

#

They’re back on track at last

The Spanish circuit of Valencia was again the home of the
first day of Formula 1 testing for the year. There’s not much to say about the
times, but Sebastian Vettel and Fernando Alonso both showed ominous reliability
with over 90 laps each.

It was not such a good day for Mercedes, whose running was
limited due to a number of problems. But both Nico Rosberg and Michael
Schumacher (pictured) still claimed the car felt good. As they say, it’s easier
to make a quick car reliable, than the other way round. If neither, a long year
awaits…
#

Formula 1 revs up for 2011

Testing is getting going now in preparation for the 2011
season. The line-up of racers is similar to last year, so what are the chances
of another cracking year?

And who, most importantly, will find themselves most often
in Overdrive? A good time of year to be an F1 fan.
#

Overdrive makes the top ten of 2010

British newspaper The Daily Telegraph (Dec 10) has listed
Overdrive among its top ten sports books of 2010.

Reviewer Simon Briggs described Overdrive as ‘eccentric but
stimulating’, while declaring it the ‘Best Metaphysical Quest’ of the sports
books released this year. Okay, so admittedly there may not have been much
competition for that particular category, but we’ll take it, thanks…
#

The world champion picks his best lap of 2010

Sebastian Vettel took ten pole positions in 2010, only the
seventh driver to do so – after Ayrton Senna, Alain Prost, Nigel Mansell, Mika
Hakkinen, Jacques Villeneuve and Michael Schumacher.

When I grabbed the chance to ask his favourite, it’s no
surprise he had to stop and think: ‘There were quite a few,’ he smiled. No
kidding. After another pause, he listed Bahrain, Australia and Hungary as his
top three. ‘But Australia was the one, where I really nailed it, even though I
lost a little bit in the last corner…’
#

Vettel mental
strength earns title

The twists and turns of 2010 will live long in the memory,
but Sebastian Vettel took a deserved maiden world title with another sublime
performance in Abu Dhabi – amply displaying how much he has up top.

‘It was an incredibly
tough season for all us, physically and especially mentally,’ he said. ‘I kept
believing in myself and today was a special day.’

#

Senna knew winning
isn’t everything

Truly great drivers, it is said, have spare mental
capacity. The concentration they need to find the limit is not all-consuming
and they have brainpower left to devise tactics or pester the pit wall for
information about action elsewhere.
Such ability will be crucial for the
2010 title challengers in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

But Ayrton Senna took it a step further. Away from the track
he found yet more cerebral volume available – so he filled it with his passion
for the wider world and despair at its injustices.

To see my new column visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22800.html

#

Showdown in Abu Dhabi

It was already looking like a tight year at the pre-season
tests – and so it has proved.

When I asked one leading designer who we should put our
money on, as he left the final test in Barcelona, he said ‘Alonso or Vettel’.
As the season goes down to the wire yet again, it’s hard to argue – though Mark
Webber’s outstanding year means he’s still in the mix.

The fact that Lewis Hamilton is ready to pick up the pieces,
if the top three take each other out, is a suitable end to a cracking year of
F1.

#

Hulk’s incredible turn

No one saw that coming… Talk about finding ‘the Zone’.
Nico Hulkenberg showed a load of promise in GP2; but what a way to confirm it
with a stunning pole lap for the Brazilian Grand Prix – with all of Europe
watching in prime time too.

In Overdrive, Hulkenberg talks of the secret being ‘to find a balance between aggression and
calmness. That comes from your brain and is partly natural…’

#

Still time for Hamilton to make his own luck

Before Korea, Lewis Hamilton described how he’d always
thought you ‘make your own luck’, but recent races had made him question that.
He also brought up the subject of 2007, when Kimi Raikkonen pipped him to the
title after being 17 points adrift with two races left.

In today’s money Hamilton has only half that gap to Alonso
heading to the final double-header in Brazil and Abu Dhabi. Now’s the time for
him to make his own luck again – and if he wants a good example he should look
see my latest grandprix.com column: http://bit.ly/axqGxI
#

Red Bulls back on top

Suzuka served as a reminder of a fact that has sometimes
been deceptively hidden in this vintage championship year: the Red Bull is the
class of the field by a country mile.

Sebastian Vettel has made good use of it recently and his
Japanese Grand Prix win was another impressive lights-to-flag win. The only
question that remains is how many of these he should have had in 2010…
#

Don’t think before you peak

After Fernando Alonso’s Singapore triumph reshuffled the
five cards on top of the F1 deck yet again, Ferrari boss Stefano Domenicali
stated that the championship is now a mental battle. He’s right –
but success in this unprecedented five-way contest will hinge not on doing the
most thinking, but the least…

Check out the thoughts of NASCAR great Jimmie Johnson and
others in my latest column at http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22651.html
#

Two greats discuss
Senna at his best

Check out this video released by McLaren
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY) to see Gerald Donaldson and Jo
Ramirez discussing Ayrton Senna’s finest hour around the streets of Monaco.

It was Donaldson’s original interview that provided the
inspiration for Overdrive – and a decade of searching for more of the same by
the other greats of Formula 1 and beyond.
#

Alonso and his crew back on form

Fernando Alonso dominated the Italian Grand Prix weekend in
a Ferrari, that was the class of the field. But after a race-long duel with
Jenson Button’s McLaren it was left to his mechanics to get it right in the
pits at his all-important stop.

They nailed it – and I’m left wondering how many of them
found ‘the Zone’…

To see Clyde’s latest column, visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22608.html
#

Head starts for Hamilton and Webber

If there remains any doubt that Grand Prix motor racing is primarily a mental contest, the Belgian
Grand Prix provided the perfect illustration.

In the most trying of circumstances – a mixture of wet and
drying conditions round Spa’s legendary mix of corners – not one of the
protagonists made it through the race without some kind of hiccup…

To hear the thoughts of F1
psychologist Dr Riccardo Ceccarelli
see Clyde’s latest grandprix.com column
at http://bit.ly/ci2duD

#

Hamilton ‘at the top of his game’

Lewis Hamilton used all his skill and mental strength to
dominate the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa, prompting eulogies from McLaren boss
Martin Whitmarsh.

There was only one dodgy moment all weekend, when Hamilton
went off on slicks on the wet track as he edged back for a pit stop. After the
race he said ‘the Lord definitely had his hand over me there, as I was able to
get away with it…’

With or without divine assistance, Hamilton needs to press
on at Monza before the Red Bulls regain the advantage at the remaining
circuits.
#

Fight or flight for Schumacher at Spa

One week after F1’s most successful team reminded us how
they tarnished their mystique, F1’s most successful driver reminds us why he so
lacked such mystique in the first place.

The Belgian Grand Prix will now be a massive one for Michael
Schumacher. After Hungary, he desperately needs to find ‘the Zone’ and steer
clear of ‘the Grip’.

To find out what that jargon means and why a multiple world
champion needs to pause for thought, see Clyde’s latest column at
http://www.grandprix.com
#

Karma Rubinho

Just when you thought Michael Schumacher’s karmic debt to
Rubens Barrichello could scarcely rise any further, along comes the move to
make any racer wince.

For those who endured the years when the pair were together
at Ferrari, what has happened this year has been curiously refreshing. While
Barrichello has shown consistently strong form in the Williams, Schumacher’s
legend diminishes daily.

It’s not as black and white as that, but today’s Hungarian
GP move shows how Schumacher’s true colours may be set fast.
#

Any sport in a storm for Alonso?

“I am a
sportsman. I love sport. I love the fans. But I don’t consider Formula 1 any
more a sport.”

These were Fernando Alonso’s words on the morning of the
2006 Italian Grand Prix. Hours earlier he’d been given a five-place grid
penalty for ‘blocking’ Ferrari’s Felipe Massa in qualifying – though Massa was
100 metres away. This was part of a bizarre run of difficulties he faced, as he
fought off the Ferrari of retiring Michael Schumacher for his second
championship…

For Clyde’s full grandprix.com column visit
http://bit.ly/b5ZT2k

#

Massa about to find his purpose?

After his recovery from the horrific injuries incurred a
year ago in Hungary, Felipe Massa spoke in near-messianic terms of a ‘reason’
behind his suffering that he was yet to discover.

The German GP showed that may not involve a Hollywood-esque
return to glory. But Massa is made of strong stuff. In Overdrive he says: ‘We
learn from good and bad things. Sometimes we think we go down, but afterwards
we come back stronger.’

If Massa can use the ultimate mental fortitude that comes
from a brush with death to unveil the contempt in which the general public are
held by those with ‘power’ in sport and elsewhere, he has the chance to become
an even greater hero.
#

The real secret behind Rossi’s recovery

Valentino Rossi’s appearance at this weekend’s German MotoGP
six weeks after a compound fracture of his leg is, by any normal standards,
miraculous. But there is a secret weapon in the armoury of all top riders: Dr
Claudio Costa.

Dr Costa is not your typical GP – but a man who firmly
believes in our ability to heal ourselves. He was also in charge of Alex
Zanardi’s recovery and his amazing attitude towards the mental power of healing
is detailed in depth in Overdrive.
#

Time for Vettel to refuse all favours

Sebastian Vettel spent his early F1 career fending off
comparisons with his illustrious compatriot, Michael Schumacher. The standard
retort for any rising star is always ‘No, I’m not the second X, I’m the first
Y.’ But Red Bull’s Silverstone antics have brought the associations flooding
back – sadly not with bright young Schu, but with Schu the pantomime villain…

To read Clyde’s full column visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22440.html

#

Time slows down for Webber

Mark Webber’s Valencia crash drew gasps from all who saw it
– but the Australian has been there before. In Overdrive, Webber speaks of how
time slowed down for him both in his eerily similar Le Mans flying incident and
the bike crash where he broke his leg.

‘I remember everything
that happened in the clearest detail,’ says Webber. ‘In both cases it was like
slow motion. It’s a strange sensation, but you have a feeling of calm in spite
of what’s happening to you.’

Overdrive contains an
entire chapter of first-hand accounts of the astonishing mental ability that
crashing unleashes
.
#

Hamilton sets up home in the Zone

It may have been a shaky start to the season for Lewis
Hamilton, but he has now found the way back to his natural home ‘in the Zone’.

Following his double win in Turkey and Canada, Hamilton is
establishing himself as the man to beat in 2010. He is displaying both his
talent and his mental strength in this mid-season purple patch. Now all they
need to do is send him to South Africa to show a bunch of other English
sportsmen how you really do it.
#

Winning isn’t everything

The Turkish Grand Prix showed how results can’t always mean
everything in Formula 1. The sport has always had team orders, but ever since
Ferrari took that to ridiculous extremes with Michael Schumacher, teams have
had to disguise them by using code words over the radio.

Whatever Red Bull and McLaren were hoping to communicate (or
not) to their drivers on Sunday will remain open to debate, particularly as the
men behind the wheel can always plead innocence under the current rules. Long
may such ‘cock-ups’ continue for the results made for fantastic racing and the
fallout over perceived favouritism may keep it that way.

#

Webber in the Zone

One week after his dominant victory in Spain, Mark Webber
showed he is a serious contender in 2010 by repeating the feat at the ultimate
driver circuit, Monaco.

Webber described it as ‘the greatest day of his life’,
expressing his delight at joining the likes of Ayrton Senna. This came a day
after his stunning pole lap described as the greatest of his life by Red Bull
team boss Christian Horner, who added he was really ‘in the Zone’. No
kidding…

#

Button and Hamilton on fire in the rain

The all-British McLaren team proved the class of the field
at a wet Chinese Grand Prix. Jenson Button showed just what an inspired move
his much-criticised switch to McLaren was, jumping back to the head of the World
Championship with his second win of the year.

Lewis Hamilton had yet another stunning race too, charging
through the field for the third time in a row after two extra early pit stops
en route to a fine second place.
#

Rosberg goes from strength to strength

While Michael Schumacher continues to struggle on his return
to F1, it is easy to overlook the impressive performances of his team-mate Nico
Rosberg.

Rosberg has made full use of the chance fate has thrown his
way. Everyone had Schumacher penned in as a dead-cert number one at Mercedes,
but the main effect of his difficult start has been to fill his young
countryman with confidence. It is still too early to rule out a turnaround for
such a great of the track, but so far Nico has been showing Schu the way to the
Zone.
#

Mechanics get in the Zone

The most spectacular difference to F1 in 2010 will be
lightning-fast pit stops. With refuelling outlawed, the guys changing the tyres
will no longer have a nice cushion of time in which to remove and replace the
four wheels.

In training some of the teams have broken the two-second
barrier. As Overdrive reveals, when time pressure is so extreme anyone can have
a Zone experience. The mechanics should prepare to fly…

#

Zanardi wins Rome Marathon

Alex Zanardi’s inspirational story continues apace. The
Italian may have swapped his high-speed machines for the rather more
leisurely-sounding hand cart – but it hasn’t made him any slower.

Zanardi kept up his preparations for the London Paralympics
in 2012 by winning the Rome Marathon at the weekend. His amazing recovery since
losing his legs in a racing car is detailed with a full-length interview in
Overdrive.
#

Vettel’s car holds together at last

Sebastian Vettel finally earned the reward his impressive
early-season form has deserved by taking a commanding win in the Malaysian
Grand Prix.

Vettel made good use of the open door kindly provided to him
by team-mate Mark Webber at the first corner and he never returned the favour.
The Red Bulls were so dominant that they won this race at a canter. They can
thank McLaren and Ferrari for their schoolboy error in qualifying yesterday,
but it was still an ominous one-two.

#

Ayrton Senna reaches half a century

Ayrton Senna would have celebrated his 50th birthday on
March 21, 2010. Senna may not have survived that long on the planet, but his
legend lives on – thanks to his outrageous talent coupled with his extraordinary
humanity and spirituality.

Senna’s day of days during qualifying for the 1988 Monaco
Grand Prix was the inspiration for Overdrive – leading to many long  hours trawling the F1 paddock for all the
current heroes, who have gone through anything similar. As Lewis Hamilton says, that was ‘beyond’ the Zone
#

Button calls the shots

Jenson Button won the Australian Grand Prix, after he kept
the calmest head of all during a frantic race on a drying track. Moments after
being passed by team-mate Lewis Hamilton, Button made a brave call to switch
from intermediate tyres to slicks. It proved inspirational, as he jumped up
through the field, eventually inheriting the lead when Sebastian Vettel
suffered a brake failure.

Hamilton also looked like he was back in the Zone after his
trying weekend with some stunning passing moves. But he ultimately lost it,
when McLaren called him in for a superfluous extra stop, a call Hamilton
described over the radio as ‘terrible’.
#

Hamilton drifts out of the Zone

Lewis Hamilton’s qualifying performance in Melbourne has
given ample indication of the importance of finding the right mental state for
racing. Hamilton’s run-in with the Melbourne traffic police on Friday – and the
predictably OTT media fallout – was enough to take him out of the Zone on
Saturday.

In the wake of last year’s ‘Liegate’ at the same event,
which similarly blew up out of all proportion, Hamilton said he had learned
from the experience and become a stronger driver and man. He has the perfect
chance to show how true that is from 11th on the grid for tomorrow’s Australian
Grand Prix.
#

Alonso takes opening win in Bahrain

Fernando Alonso looked like the first driver to find the
Zone in 2010, leading home team-mate Felipe Massa in a Ferrari one-two at the
Bahrain Grand Prix.

Alonso inherited the lead from Sebastian Vettel, when the
German’s Red Bull suffered a spark plug glitch late on. Vettel still limped to
4th, just behind Lewis Hamilton’s McLaren. Nico Rosberg pipped Michael
Schumacher to 5th in the Mercedes, with Jenson Button and Mark Webber next up.
#

Massa thanks God for successful return

Felipe Massa pointedly thanked God for his recovery from
injury during the televised press conference after returning to racing with
second place in Bahrain.

The Brazilian driver, like so many of his sporting
countrymen, has always had a strong faith. This part of the mentality of sport
is explored at length in Overdrive – with quotes from Massa, Rubens
Barrichello, Kaka, Cafu and others.
#

Bruno Senna makes it at last

After a desperate winter of waiting and worrying, Bruno
Senna has finally been confirmed as a driver with the renamed HRT F1 team.

The Brazilian, nephew of Ayrton, whose exploits are so
crucial to Overdrive, will make his F1 debut in Bahrain. The addition of yet
another famous name adds further to the astonishing line-up of stars for 2010.

 In ‘Overdrive’ Bruno admits that he has not
yet reached the same magical sensation of ‘the Zone’ as his uncle in a racing
car, though he’d felt it in karting before the break from racing imposed on him
by family tragedy. This mid-season start is unlikely to help him find it soon
but here’s hoping

From http://overdrivef1.com/news.html

Reproduced with permission (thanks Clyde and Overdrive)

craig
#

About
the submitter:

Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes
in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through
encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest”
dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion,
and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great
Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF
A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of
‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

He’s also currently writing a new book to be titled ‘Racing
in the Zone’
and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’. Obsessive or WHAT!!!

http://www.craiglockbooks.com http://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The
various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 www.creativekiwis.com/index.php/books/74-craigs-books http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock+ www.lulu.com/craiglock

Craig’s
motor racing blogs are at grandprixchampion.wordpress.com and
grandprixdrivermyblog.wordpress.com

The
submitter’s other blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles,
books and new manuscripts) are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.com

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together,
one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact,
encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest
potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article
may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the source web site, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad
and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken
another course!

“Sometimes
you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you
were meant to live.”

“I
want to write the way Gilles Villeneuve drove and power-slid his blood-red
Formula One Ferrari… with wild enthusiasm and a sense of abandonment, combined
with the artists craft of a Stirling Moss, a Jim Clark, and especially that of
the great Ayrton Senna, living on the razor-blade edge of life.”

for dearest mom and dad, your spirits lives on (forever)

thanks for all the support, encouragement and especially love

“All the world will be
happier and better, when the men and women have the souls of artists,, like
that of an Ayrton Senna.

– craig (as inspired by Rodin’s famous words)

PPS

Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY

!!!

FORMULA ONE IN THE ZONE ( from OVERDRIVE news- Part Two)

Web site: http://overdrivef1.com/news.html

Shared with permission (thanks Clyde and Overdrive)

Category (tags, key
words): Overdrive, Clyde Brolin, Ayrton Senna, Motor racing, motor sport, Grand
Prix drivers, fil “reviews”, “book reviews”, Formula One, “the zone”,
“in the zone”, ‘Racing in the Zone’, ‘FI in the Zone’, Grand Prix
racing, sport, success, achievement, peak performance, mind, mind-power,
motivation, champion, elite sports-people, excellence (enough there now, craig)

Submitter’s note:

The layout on this blog is not nearly as good
(“professional”) as on the above web site; however I am able to “bolden” what I feel to be key points on racing ‘in the zone.’ (Makes them stand
out). Thanks for the understanding
!

Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY!!!

craig
#

“The pleasure comes from feeling you’re at the limit.
When you keep it there for an entire lap or the entire race, that’s the thrill
of racing.”

– multiple World Champion, Michael Schumacher

“If you are in the flow and everything is right, then
you feel it. I know that I am able to do this, but I know you have to pull it
in the right moment of time and that success rate is not yet 100 per
cent.”

– “Schuey” (again)

“You get to the stage when your almost looking down on
yourself. When you get into that state, it’s the best feeling you can
have.”

– Stirling Moss (probably the best driver never to have won
the World Championship and the writer’s boyhood hero)

“A human being is an incredible machine, totally
undiscovered in many ways. Every one of us has a hidden tank of energy that
comes out when it’s really needed.”

– Alex Zanardi (former Indycar driver, who lost both legs in
a high-speed accident. Alex now courageously drives production cars, specially
adapted, in Europe)

“The best thing is when everything is natural and
everything flows. It doesn’t happen all of the time, but only on certain special
occasions.”

– Valentino Rossi, multiple motor-cycle World Champion

“Normally I can recall every detail, but on some of my
best laps sometimes there’s such a rush that I don’t remember anything
afterwards.

– Jensen Button (2009 World Drivers Champion)

“When you’re really on it everything flows. That’s the
best feeling in driving and it’s why you do it. It doesn’t happen all of the
time, but only on special occasions.”

– Sebastian Vettel (World Champion in 2010 and 2011)

“You arrive at a point where you feel you’re not in a
Formula 1 car but a Scalextric. Winning a world championship leads to
recognition and is good for self-confidence, but inside your heart and your
mind this feeling is better.”

– Fernando Alonso (double World Champion in 2005 and 2006??)

from http://www.overdrivef1.com/

#                     #

Sebastian Vettel may have another pole position in the bag,
but for his countryman to block everything out and make the top ten in Valencia
is mighty impressive.
#

Button’s been to the Zone before…

Jenson Button s win from the back of the field in the 2011
Canadian Grand Prix is an instant F1 classic. As he described it: “It’s
definitely my best race: a very special race to win from where I was and I will
remember this for a long time.”

But it is not the first time Button has found the Zone in
a  F1 car. In ‘Overdrive: Formula 1 in the Zone’, he describes the motor
racing equivalent of a cricketer or baseball hitter seeing the ball as big as a
football often in qualifying
. But even when he was struggling in lesser
machinery, many of his greatest moments came in wet/dry conditions similar to
yesterday in Montreal.

One eerily familiar-sounding experience came at the 2007
European GP, when a heavy shower just before the off meant most drivers had no
chance to change their dry tyres. Button was 19th at the first corner, only to
surge up to 4th in a stunning first two laps.

“That was strange, says Button. I don’t know why I was
so much quicker but I was. I had nothing to lose and at every corner I just passed
two or three cars. It felt like everyone else was in slow motion. Maybe people
were being a bit cautious,  I don t know.
The first couple of corners were important for getting heat into the tyres and
maybe I was able to do that better  than
other people. But it was a great event.”

Pity this great event only lasted until lap three, when
Button joined a bunch of cars in the wall after aquaplaning off at the first
corner. The end result had been rather more glorious at Hungary a year earlier,
when unseasonal rain helped him to his first win.

“The race conditions were similar, he adds. But it wasn’t
just those two races that I was quick and that I felt good. It was just that
other people weren’t performing as I was, I suppose. It was similar at Shanghai
in 2007. When we all put slick tyres on,  I was just able to do well.  I don’t know why, it was quite strange. It’s a
great feeling to perform like that, especially when the car is not competitive.
But it’s not crossing the line in fifth place that s exciting,  it’s the moves,  it’s the passing people.”

That  fifth place
reference was prescient, as Button also found this magical feeling on the day
he secured his world title with that position in Brazil. When, like yesterday,
passing people has the additional benefit of a victory, there is no greater
feeling in a racing car.
#

Button on fire in the wet

Jenson Button produced ‘the best’ race of his life to take a
scarcely believable win in the Canadian Grand Prix, despite having dropped to
the back of the field after a series of incidents early in the race.

Following a string of setbacks including clashes with
team-mate Lewis Hamilton and Ferrari’s Fernando Alonso, Button found a level of
performance that blew the rest of the field away. In wet/dry conditions where
he has long been the master, he made full use of a late safety car period
before passing Michael Schumacher, Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel in quick
succession in the dying moments.

A stunning win. Was he in the Zone? You bet…
#

Imperious Vettel run continues

The order on the grid has changed – a bit – for the Canadian
Grand Prix, with the Ferraris occupying P2 and P3 on the grid.

But the all-important man sitting at the front hasn’t
changed. Sebastian Vettel continues to demonstrate the majestic form of a world
champion with all the confidence that title brings.

Vettel has had two big crashes already this year, but the
difference to previous years is that they have come in free practice. He
recovered to win after the last one and now he’s in the best position to repeat
the feat in Montreal.
#

Mark Webber takes a stand

With the subject of a 2011 reinstatement of the Bahrain Grand
Prix still on the agenda, Mark Webber
has been the first current F1 figure of any kind to point out the moral, rather
than expedient, element to the decision.

“When people in a country are being hurt, the issues are bigger
than sport
,”  he tweeted under
his tag AussieGrit. “Let’s hope the
right decision is made…”

In the week of the Senna movie premiere in the UK, it is apt
that a driver should be the one with the guts to show the ‘bigwigs’ the way on
humanity in global affairs.

1996 world champion Damon Hill made his own point to the
Daily Mail: “F1 must align itself with progression, not repression, and a lot
of demonstrations in that country have been brutally repressed. You are either
aware of that or you’re not.”

#

Vettel makes his own luck as Hamilton self-destructs

Sebastian Vettel held on for victory at Monaco – and all
despite being given the wrong tyres at his pit stop, due to a pair of
fortuitously-timed safety car interruptions.

Vettel held off the charging Fernando Alonso and Jenson
Button but the race was denied a grandstand finish by a red flag due to a crash
involving Vitaly Petrov.

By contrast with the immaculate driving of the top three,
Lewis Hamilton endured a bitterly frustrating weekend on the principality’s
streets. To make matters worse, he let fly after the race with accusations that
he is being victimised by race stewards.

A far cry from his stunning win in 2008 when he found ‘the
Zone’ and shone…

#

Perez escapes heavy shunt

Sauber’s Sergio Perez had a lucky escape from a major crash
at the chicane during qualifying for the Monaco Grand Prix.

The young Mexican had been on strong form throughout the
weekend and he was on his flying lap in Q3 when he got out of shape and slid
helplessly into the barriers. There was alarm when he failed to get out of the
car; but the latest reports suggest he has suffered only concussion and a
sprained thigh.
#

Vettel and Hamilton in another league

Formula 1 is going through a vintage period, with half a
dozen superstar drivers at the top of their game. But today’s Spanish Grand
Prix showed that two of them have the potential to ease away from the rest.

Sebastian Vettel and Lewis Hamilton have both shown their
ability to find ‘the Zone’ on numerous occasions in their short careers so far.
Moreover, both should have their best years and their best performances ahead
of them. If they can both stay in competitive machinery then we could see many
more classic duels like today’s.

#

Alonso finds the Zone

No wonder Fernando Alonso was whooping like a child on his
in-lap after qualifying 4th for the Spanish GP: it seems he found the Zone out
there today…

“I did a perfect
lap,” he was quoted by Autosport. “I reckon that if I tried to repeat
it twenty times, I could not do better! When you do a lap like that, it’s hard
to put into words what one feels: always being on the limit, in every corner is
a really special feeling for a driver.”

In Overdrive Alonso goes into detail about what the Zone
feels like: “You arrive at a point
where you feel you’re not in a Formula 1 car but a Scalextric. Winning a world
championship leads to recognition and is good for self-confidence, but inside
your heart and your mind this feeling is better.”

#

Webber on pole at last

Mark Webber finally earned a psychological lift over his
team-mate Sebastian Vettel by taking pole position for the Spanish Grand Prix.

Vettel will start second for the first time in 2011, two
tenths adrift, though he did not have his KERS working in Q3. Lewis Hamilton
took third for McLaren, ahead of charging home star Fernando Alonso, who was
delighted with his lap to split the McLarens in 4th.

#

Schumacher still seeking ‘the flow’

Michael Schumacher is still holding out hope that he can
regain the once-routine, now elusive ‘flow’
that marks out the greatest moments a sportsman can enjoy.

Speaking in a press briefing for this weekend’s Spanish
Grand Prix, the German acknowledged that he cannot afford to make the kind of
elementary errors that sent him ‘over the edge’ in Turkey. But he still
believes he has what it takes to find the magical feeling of the limit.

“If you are in
the flow and everything is right, then you feel it,” Schumacher was quoted
by Autosport. “I know that I am able to do this, but I know you have to
pull it in the right moment of time and that success rate is not yet 100 per
cent.”

No kidding, but Schumacher showed glimpses of his old self
during free practice in Turkey and with Mercedes on the up, it would be a brave
man to bet against him pulling out something special and finding that flow now
he is firmly established as the underdog.

#

Sporting success owed to joy

Fun is underrated in the life of a sportsman. We know they
have to spend decades fighting and working their way to the top of their
profession; but without happiness prompting it all, the rest just wouldn’t
follow.
*              *

In Overdrive, John Surtees spoke of what made Michael
Schumacher so special first time around: “It’s vital to do something in
your life that gives you a kick and that you actually enjoy apart from the
payday. Someone like Schumacher analyses everything very carefully, but
the important thing is that he is actually enjoying himself. He has a
sparkle.”

Schumacher’s comments after his eventful Turkish Grand Prix
about not finding the same big joy out there indicate that sparkle may be
fading at last.

#

Overdrive shortlisted for British Sports Book Awards

‘Overdrive: Formula 1’ in the Zone has made the shortlist
for the British Sports Book Awards to be held on May 9, 2011 at London’s Savoy
Hotel.

Author Clyde Brolin is one of six in the shortlist for the
Best New Writer award – along with Steve Bunce, Matthew Syed, Mike Perham,
Daniel Harris and Neil Clack.

See http://www.britishsportsbookawards.co.uk/book/byhierarchy/11/237

#

A tale of three Germans

Today’s qualifying for the Turkish Grand Prix boiled down to
the performances of three German drivers.

Sebastian Vettel romped to his 4th pole of the season, despite
missing most of yesterday’s practice after crashing out. But it was the pace of
the Mercedes that caught the eye. The team showed a lot of promise in Barcelona
testing; but had yet to fulfil it, until Nico Rosberg’s 3rd place on the
Istanbul grid.

More alarming, though, is the failure of Michael Schumacher
to capitalise on what is clearly an improving car. He was out-shined yet again
by his younger team-mate, this time to the tune of more than a second.
#

Overdrive as a ‘haiku’

In the spirit of David Bader’s ‘One Hundred Great Books in
Haiku’, here’s ‘Overdrive: Formula 1’ in the Zone in rather briefer form:

Out of his body,

Senna flew round Monaco.

He was not alone…

#

Hamilton wins stunning Chinese GP

Lewis Hamilton stormed to victory in a thrilling Grand Prix
at Shanghai today. The Briton kept up his record of winning a race in each of
his seasons in the sport with a trademark battle through the field. Afterwards
a delighted Hamilton described himself as feeling “blessed”, adding: “This race is in my top three of race
wins – it’s up there with Silverstone and Monaco in 2008.”

Sebastian Vettel had no answer on his two-stop strategy; but
held on for second, while his Red Bull team-mate Mark Webber looked every bit
as much ‘in the Zone’as Hamilton, as he made it up from 18th to the podium.

#

Cool Vettel stretches lead

Sebastian Vettel is starting to develop an invincible aura
after his second straight victory at today’s Malaysian Grand Prix. On the
slowing down lap he praised the ‘cool heads’ of the team in the hot conditions
and he showed them the way. That coolness under pressure is what ‘the Zone’ is
all about.

Jenson Button and Nick Heidfeld were both delighted to be on
the podium, gaining momentum back over the respective team-mates since
Australia.

#

Hamilton finds the edge to press Vettel

Lewis Hamilton produced a near-immaculate lap to close to
within a tenth of pole man Sebastian Vettel in qualifying for the Malaysian
Grand Prix. With their team-mates in line astern behind them and the
ever-present threat of serious rain at Sepang, it means Sunday’s race is
beautifully poised.

“That was an almost perfect lap,” said Hamilton.
“I lost a tenth-and-a-half in Turn 14, so we’re much closer to the front
than we’d anticipated.”

If Hamilton can keep it up, it will be good news for the
Formula 1 season ahead, which is shaping up for a battle royal between Red Bull
and McLaren.
#

Team order restored

The Australian Grand Prix was a chance for the lead drivers
from the top teams to assert themselves early in the season.

Sebastian Vettel took the win, destroying team-mate Mark
Webber in the process. Lewis Hamilton’s second place was a similarly strong
performance, while Jenson Button struggled in traffic behind. Then there was
Fernando Alonso, who was ushered past Felipe Massa within seconds of catching
him on track in this new era of freedom with team orders. While both Mercedes
dropped out, Renault’s Vitaly Petrov (pictured) was the star of the show,
taking a deserved podium.
#

Vettel on fire Down Under

Sebastian Vettel produced the dominant performance of a
champion brimming with confidence in the first qualifying session of the year
to take pole by three quarters of a second.

Last year he told me his Melbourne pole was his favourite of
all, even though he admitted he’d screwed up the last corner (see story below).
This year it seemed he went one better – an ominous sign for the rest. Lewis Hamilton
has every right to his delight at McLaren’s turnaround after taking second
place, but many will already be scratching their heads.

#

Good news at the top

After their winter struggles, McLaren showed they had made
progress by taking a one-two for Jenson Button (pictured) and Lewis Hamilton in
Friday’s second practice for the Australian Grand Prix – though Red Bull
dominated in the morning.

The times have to be taken with a barrow-load of salt,
because the big teams were only doing race work – and in recent years McLaren
have often flattered to deceive on Fridays. Still, it shows that they will be
closer to the front than they would have dared dream, as they manhandled their
car round Barcelona earlier this month. They could yet mount a challenge to
favourites Red Bull.

#

Schumacher jumps up the order

Mercedes finally started work with its definitive package
today at Barcelona and Michael Schumacher immediately showed the team mean
business, recording a best lap of 1m 21.268s, the fastest of the winter –
albeit during a qualifying simulation.

At the previous test Mercedes were not hiding their
problems, which included an overheating exhaust. But if they can make this new
package reliable, they could be firmly in the Melbourne mix.

#

Red Bull and Ferrari on song

With the final pre-season F1 test under way at Barcelona,
the apparent formbook – for what it’s worth amid the winter smoke and mirrors –
remains unchanged. Red Bull continue to set the best headline times while
Ferrari look strong over long runs.

Unless one of the other teams comes up with a radical
overhaul by the time the freight leaves for Melbourne – Mercedes have, for
example, promised a new package this week – the sensible money has to be on
2010’s usual suspects.
#

Get well soon JYS

Best wishes go to Jackie Stewart, who was taken ill
suffering from chest pains on a flight from Geneva to London today. His son
Paul has spoken to him and reports all seems well, so fingers crossed.

Jackie is one of the major contributors to Overdrive and the
font of much wisdom, as the winner of three F1 world championships. Here’s a
sample quote from him on how the true greats operate… “Many sportsmen experience the Zone once or twice a year. But
somebody really good can create that on a regular basis and not have to wait
for that day.”

#

McLaren most in need of delay

The belated removal of Bahrain from the F1 calendar means
that teams have much more time to prepare for the first race, now the
Australian Grand Prix on March 27.

Of all the teams in Barcelona that will have been most
welcomed by McLaren, for whom both Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton struggled
this week. Button had his running regularly curtailed by technical problems,
while Hamilton (pictured) found it hard to get his tyres to last. With Ferrari
and Red Bull piling on the mileage and looking quick, McLaren need every extra
second they can find.
#

F1 misses the boat

Formula 1 personnel pride themselves on their ability to
make quick decisions to stay at the top of their game. Yet when the one obvious
big decision comes along it passes everyone by.

Last night Red Bull boss, Christian Horner (pictured) had to
face the press on behalf of the teams to say they would wait for their lead from
the FOM and the FIA about whether or not to travel to Bahrain.

The equipment has to leave by February 25 and no doubt there
are all manner of complicated clauses in contracts to obey. But the chance to
make a simple moral statement by doing the decent thing has now passed.

#

Vitantonio Liuzzi on his Hispania return

How important is it to you to be on the F1 grid?

I’m a driver, I love to race. And it s difficult to stay
away from the race and the grid. But you have to find the best environment for
yourself. I think the plans in this team are good and they can make a step
forward.

What did you make of the clamour to get you back into the
sport when you parted ways with Force India?

Of course I was happy that a lot of people in the paddock,
who know this business realise and understand what my potential is. But not
everyone agrees. We know that F1 is a difficult business, where there is sport,
politics, all these other things…and we have to be strong in all these parts.
At the moment my biggest strength is the sporting side, not the others. But
I’ll keep fighting and hope to get a winning car in the future.

How did you feel, when Robert Kubica said you would have
been his choice as substitute for the Renault seat?

It was a great feeling, because all the drivers in the
paddock know what each other’s level is. And fortunately from the driving side,
I’ve always had big support. But F1 is a business, where it’s not just the
skill, it’s a lot of other things, and we have to accept it. Robert has been
great to me, and I just hope that he can recover as soon as possible and get
back in that seat …because he deserves it.
#

Bahrain GP in doubt

The powers-that-be normally ensure that the Formula 1
paddock is immune from the real world and its ‘inconvenient’ problems – but the
tragic events unfolding in Bahrain have put a stop to that.

This weekend’s GP2 race has been cancelled, throwing the
imminent F1 test and race into doubt. It would be nice to imagine any decision
would be taken on moral, rather than expedient grounds. But given ‘previous’
rumblings, perhaps it’s wiser not to raise such hopes.
#

Heidfeld finds another way back

Nick Heidfeld has never been the flavour of the month in F1
circles, which is why he so regularly finds himself having to force his way
back in via shootouts for race seats. It is nearly a decade since I sat with
him at a dark Jerez as he tried to convince Jordan to employ him.

This year it’s Renault – and he seems to have done the job
at Jerez again with the fastest time on day three of the test. If so, it would
be the deserved fruit of his unrelenting pursuit of a dream. Let’s not forget
he has eight second places in F1, including Canada in 2008, when he moved over
early on for the eventual winner – and then BMW team-mate – Robert Kubica.

#

Kubica recovery could take a year

Surgeons have spent seven hours battling to save Robert
Kubica’s right hand, after he suffered a heavy crash during a rally in Italy. A
guard-rail is believed to have come through the footwell of Kubica’s Skoda,
leaving him with fractures to his right leg and arm. But it was the hand that
caused the most concern due to problems with the blood supply.

At the end of the operation doctors remained cautious,
saying it would be a week before further judgement could be taken on the
success of the procedure. If it has worked, the hand itself will nevertheless
take a year to recover.

Kubica has long lived in Italy to work alongside Dr Riccardo Ceccarelli (left), one of
the most experienced doctors in F1. Ceccarelli is alongside Kubica, while hand
specialist Professor Igor Rosello
led the surgical team.
#

Robert Kubica crashes heavily on Italian rally

Robert Kubica’s hopes of the 2011 F1 title appear over after
he suffered a heavy crash during an Italian rally this morning. Full details
have not yet been released from the hospital; but the Polish driver is reported
to have suffered injuries to his right hand, arm and leg, that will rule him
out for the foreseeable future.

The Renault team, sponsored by Lotus, has taken an
aggressive approach to its design this year and Kubica even set the best lap
time of the Valencia test. The news leaves Bruno Senna in pole position to
inherit the drive.
#

Pirelli good for telly?

While there’s never much point in analysing headline lap
times at the early winter tests, one development already looks interesting.
Over long runs the times rapidly get worse, due to the degradation of the new
Pirelli tyres.

It’s cold in Valencia, so not entirely representative; but
if this continues, be prepared for multiple pit stops during the races in 2011.
Deliberate or not, it could be good for the show.

#

They’re back on track at last

The Spanish circuit of Valencia was again the home of the
first day of Formula 1 testing for the year. There’s not much to say about the
times, but Sebastian Vettel and Fernando Alonso both showed ominous reliability
with over 90 laps each.

It was not such a good day for Mercedes, whose running was
limited due to a number of problems. But both Nico Rosberg and Michael
Schumacher (pictured) still claimed the car felt good. As they say, it’s easier
to make a quick car reliable, than the other way round. If neither, a long year
awaits…
#

Formula 1 revs up for 2011

Testing is getting going now in preparation for the 2011
season. The line-up of racers is similar to last year, so what are the chances
of another cracking year?

And who, most importantly, will find themselves most often
in Overdrive? A good time of year to be an F1 fan.
#

Overdrive makes the top ten of 2010

British newspaper The Daily Telegraph (Dec 10) has listed
Overdrive among its top ten sports books of 2010.

Reviewer Simon Briggs described Overdrive as ‘eccentric but
stimulating’, while declaring it the ‘Best Metaphysical Quest’ of the sports
books released this year. Okay, so admittedly there may not have been much
competition for that particular category, but we’ll take it, thanks…
#

The world champion picks his best lap of 2010

Sebastian Vettel took ten pole positions in 2010, only the
seventh driver to do so – after Ayrton Senna, Alain Prost, Nigel Mansell, Mika
Hakkinen, Jacques Villeneuve and Michael Schumacher.

When I grabbed the chance to ask his favourite, it’s no
surprise he had to stop and think: ‘There were quite a few,’ he smiled. No
kidding. After another pause, he listed Bahrain, Australia and Hungary as his
top three. ‘But Australia was the one, where I really nailed it, even though I
lost a little bit in the last corner…’
#

Vettel mental
strength earns title

The twists and turns of 2010 will live long in the memory,
but Sebastian Vettel took a deserved maiden world title with another sublime
performance in Abu Dhabi – amply displaying how much he has up top.

‘It was an incredibly
tough season for all us, physically and especially mentally,’ he said. ‘I kept
believing in myself and today was a special day.’

#

Senna knew winning
isn’t everything

Truly great drivers, it is said, have spare mental
capacity. The concentration they need to find the limit is not all-consuming
and they have brainpower left to devise tactics or pester the pit wall for
information about action elsewhere.
Such ability will be crucial for the
2010 title challengers in Abu Dhabi this weekend.

But Ayrton Senna took it a step further. Away from the track
he found yet more cerebral volume available – so he filled it with his passion
for the wider world and despair at its injustices.

To see my new column visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22800.html

#

Showdown in Abu Dhabi

It was already looking like a tight year at the pre-season
tests – and so it has proved.

When I asked one leading designer who we should put our
money on, as he left the final test in Barcelona, he said ‘Alonso or Vettel’.
As the season goes down to the wire yet again, it’s hard to argue – though Mark
Webber’s outstanding year means he’s still in the mix.

The fact that Lewis Hamilton is ready to pick up the pieces,
if the top three take each other out, is a suitable end to a cracking year of
F1.

#

Hulk’s incredible turn

No one saw that coming… Talk about finding ‘the Zone’.
Nico Hulkenberg showed a load of promise in GP2; but what a way to confirm it
with a stunning pole lap for the Brazilian Grand Prix – with all of Europe
watching in prime time too.

In Overdrive, Hulkenberg talks of the secret being ‘to find a balance between aggression and
calmness. That comes from your brain and is partly natural…’

#

Still time for Hamilton to make his own luck

Before Korea, Lewis Hamilton described how he’d always
thought you ‘make your own luck’, but recent races had made him question that.
He also brought up the subject of 2007, when Kimi Raikkonen pipped him to the
title after being 17 points adrift with two races left.

In today’s money Hamilton has only half that gap to Alonso
heading to the final double-header in Brazil and Abu Dhabi. Now’s the time for
him to make his own luck again – and if he wants a good example he should look
see my latest grandprix.com column: http://bit.ly/axqGxI
#

Red Bulls back on top

Suzuka served as a reminder of a fact that has sometimes
been deceptively hidden in this vintage championship year: the Red Bull is the
class of the field by a country mile.

Sebastian Vettel has made good use of it recently and his
Japanese Grand Prix win was another impressive lights-to-flag win. The only
question that remains is how many of these he should have had in 2010…
#

Don’t think before you peak

After Fernando Alonso’s Singapore triumph reshuffled the
five cards on top of the F1 deck yet again, Ferrari boss Stefano Domenicali
stated that the championship is now a mental battle. He’s right –
but success in this unprecedented five-way contest will hinge not on doing the
most thinking, but the least…

Check out the thoughts of NASCAR great Jimmie Johnson and
others in my latest column at http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22651.html
#

Two greats discuss
Senna at his best

Check out this video released by McLaren
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY) to see Gerald Donaldson and Jo
Ramirez discussing Ayrton Senna’s finest hour around the streets of Monaco.

It was Donaldson’s original interview that provided the
inspiration for Overdrive – and a decade of searching for more of the same by
the other greats of Formula 1 and beyond.
#

Alonso and his crew back on form

Fernando Alonso dominated the Italian Grand Prix weekend in
a Ferrari, that was the class of the field. But after a race-long duel with
Jenson Button’s McLaren it was left to his mechanics to get it right in the
pits at his all-important stop.

They nailed it – and I’m left wondering how many of them
found ‘the Zone’…

To see Clyde’s latest column, visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22608.html
#

Head starts for Hamilton and Webber

If there remains any doubt that Grand Prix motor racing is primarily a mental contest, the Belgian
Grand Prix provided the perfect illustration.

In the most trying of circumstances – a mixture of wet and
drying conditions round Spa’s legendary mix of corners – not one of the
protagonists made it through the race without some kind of hiccup…

To hear the thoughts of F1
psychologist Dr Riccardo Ceccarelli
see Clyde’s latest grandprix.com column
at http://bit.ly/ci2duD

#

Hamilton ‘at the top of his game’

Lewis Hamilton used all his skill and mental strength to
dominate the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa, prompting eulogies from McLaren boss
Martin Whitmarsh.

There was only one dodgy moment all weekend, when Hamilton
went off on slicks on the wet track as he edged back for a pit stop. After the
race he said ‘the Lord definitely had his hand over me there, as I was able to
get away with it…’

With or without divine assistance, Hamilton needs to press
on at Monza before the Red Bulls regain the advantage at the remaining
circuits.
#

Fight or flight for Schumacher at Spa

One week after F1’s most successful team reminded us how
they tarnished their mystique, F1’s most successful driver reminds us why he so
lacked such mystique in the first place.

The Belgian Grand Prix will now be a massive one for Michael
Schumacher. After Hungary, he desperately needs to find ‘the Zone’ and steer
clear of ‘the Grip’.

To find out what that jargon means and why a multiple world
champion needs to pause for thought, see Clyde’s latest column at
http://www.grandprix.com
#

Karma Rubinho

Just when you thought Michael Schumacher’s karmic debt to
Rubens Barrichello could scarcely rise any further, along comes the move to
make any racer wince.

For those who endured the years when the pair were together
at Ferrari, what has happened this year has been curiously refreshing. While
Barrichello has shown consistently strong form in the Williams, Schumacher’s
legend diminishes daily.

It’s not as black and white as that, but today’s Hungarian
GP move shows how Schumacher’s true colours may be set fast.
#

Any sport in a storm for Alonso?

“I am a
sportsman. I love sport. I love the fans. But I don’t consider Formula 1 any
more a sport.”

These were Fernando Alonso’s words on the morning of the
2006 Italian Grand Prix. Hours earlier he’d been given a five-place grid
penalty for ‘blocking’ Ferrari’s Felipe Massa in qualifying – though Massa was
100 metres away. This was part of a bizarre run of difficulties he faced, as he
fought off the Ferrari of retiring Michael Schumacher for his second
championship…

For Clyde’s full grandprix.com column visit
http://bit.ly/b5ZT2k

#

Massa about to find his purpose?

After his recovery from the horrific injuries incurred a
year ago in Hungary, Felipe Massa spoke in near-messianic terms of a ‘reason’
behind his suffering that he was yet to discover.

The German GP showed that may not involve a Hollywood-esque
return to glory. But Massa is made of strong stuff. In Overdrive he says: ‘We
learn from good and bad things. Sometimes we think we go down, but afterwards
we come back stronger.’

If Massa can use the ultimate mental fortitude that comes
from a brush with death to unveil the contempt in which the general public are
held by those with ‘power’ in sport and elsewhere, he has the chance to become
an even greater hero.
#

The real secret behind Rossi’s recovery

Valentino Rossi’s appearance at this weekend’s German MotoGP
six weeks after a compound fracture of his leg is, by any normal standards,
miraculous. But there is a secret weapon in the armoury of all top riders: Dr
Claudio Costa.

Dr Costa is not your typical GP – but a man who firmly
believes in our ability to heal ourselves. He was also in charge of Alex
Zanardi’s recovery and his amazing attitude towards the mental power of healing
is detailed in depth in Overdrive.
#

Time for Vettel to refuse all favours

Sebastian Vettel spent his early F1 career fending off
comparisons with his illustrious compatriot, Michael Schumacher. The standard
retort for any rising star is always ‘No, I’m not the second X, I’m the first
Y.’ But Red Bull’s Silverstone antics have brought the associations flooding
back – sadly not with bright young Schu, but with Schu the pantomime villain…

To read Clyde’s full column visit
http://www.grandprix.com/ft/ft22440.html

#

Time slows down for Webber

Mark Webber’s Valencia crash drew gasps from all who saw it
– but the Australian has been there before. In Overdrive, Webber speaks of how
time slowed down for him both in his eerily similar Le Mans flying incident and
the bike crash where he broke his leg.

‘I remember everything
that happened in the clearest detail,’ says Webber. ‘In both cases it was like
slow motion. It’s a strange sensation, but you have a feeling of calm in spite
of what’s happening to you.’

Overdrive contains an
entire chapter of first-hand accounts of the astonishing mental ability that
crashing unleashes
.
#

Hamilton sets up home in the Zone

It may have been a shaky start to the season for Lewis
Hamilton, but he has now found the way back to his natural home ‘in the Zone’.

Following his double win in Turkey and Canada, Hamilton is
establishing himself as the man to beat in 2010. He is displaying both his
talent and his mental strength in this mid-season purple patch. Now all they
need to do is send him to South Africa to show a bunch of other English
sportsmen how you really do it.
#

Winning isn’t everything

The Turkish Grand Prix showed how results can’t always mean
everything in Formula 1. The sport has always had team orders, but ever since
Ferrari took that to ridiculous extremes with Michael Schumacher, teams have
had to disguise them by using code words over the radio.

Whatever Red Bull and McLaren were hoping to communicate (or
not) to their drivers on Sunday will remain open to debate, particularly as the
men behind the wheel can always plead innocence under the current rules. Long
may such ‘cock-ups’ continue for the results made for fantastic racing and the
fallout over perceived favouritism may keep it that way.

#

Webber in the Zone

One week after his dominant victory in Spain, Mark Webber
showed he is a serious contender in 2010 by repeating the feat at the ultimate
driver circuit, Monaco.

Webber described it as ‘the greatest day of his life’,
expressing his delight at joining the likes of Ayrton Senna. This came a day
after his stunning pole lap described as the greatest of his life by Red Bull
team boss Christian Horner, who added he was really ‘in the Zone’. No
kidding…

#

Button and Hamilton on fire in the rain

The all-British McLaren team proved the class of the field
at a wet Chinese Grand Prix. Jenson Button showed just what an inspired move
his much-criticised switch to McLaren was, jumping back to the head of the World
Championship with his second win of the year.

Lewis Hamilton had yet another stunning race too, charging
through the field for the third time in a row after two extra early pit stops
en route to a fine second place.
#

Rosberg goes from strength to strength

While Michael Schumacher continues to struggle on his return
to F1, it is easy to overlook the impressive performances of his team-mate Nico
Rosberg.

Rosberg has made full use of the chance fate has thrown his
way. Everyone had Schumacher penned in as a dead-cert number one at Mercedes,
but the main effect of his difficult start has been to fill his young
countryman with confidence. It is still too early to rule out a turnaround for
such a great of the track, but so far Nico has been showing Schu the way to the
Zone.
#

Mechanics get in the Zone

The most spectacular difference to F1 in 2010 will be
lightning-fast pit stops. With refuelling outlawed, the guys changing the tyres
will no longer have a nice cushion of time in which to remove and replace the
four wheels.

In training some of the teams have broken the two-second
barrier. As Overdrive reveals, when time pressure is so extreme anyone can have
a Zone experience. The mechanics should prepare to fly…

#

Zanardi wins Rome Marathon

Alex Zanardi’s inspirational story continues apace. The
Italian may have swapped his high-speed machines for the rather more
leisurely-sounding hand cart – but it hasn’t made him any slower.

Zanardi kept up his preparations for the London Paralympics
in 2012 by winning the Rome Marathon at the weekend. His amazing recovery since
losing his legs in a racing car is detailed with a full-length interview in
Overdrive.
#

Vettel’s car holds together at last

Sebastian Vettel finally earned the reward his impressive
early-season form has deserved by taking a commanding win in the Malaysian
Grand Prix.

Vettel made good use of the open door kindly provided to him
by team-mate Mark Webber at the first corner and he never returned the favour.
The Red Bulls were so dominant that they won this race at a canter. They can
thank McLaren and Ferrari for their schoolboy error in qualifying yesterday,
but it was still an ominous one-two.

#

Ayrton Senna reaches half a century

Ayrton Senna would have celebrated his 50th birthday on
March 21, 2010. Senna may not have survived that long on the planet, but his
legend lives on – thanks to his outrageous talent coupled with his extraordinary
humanity and spirituality.

Senna’s day of days during qualifying for the 1988 Monaco
Grand Prix was the inspiration for Overdrive – leading to many long  hours trawling the F1 paddock for all the
current heroes, who have gone through anything similar. As Lewis Hamilton says, that was ‘beyond’ the Zone
#

Button calls the shots

Jenson Button won the Australian Grand Prix, after he kept
the calmest head of all during a frantic race on a drying track. Moments after
being passed by team-mate Lewis Hamilton, Button made a brave call to switch
from intermediate tyres to slicks. It proved inspirational, as he jumped up
through the field, eventually inheriting the lead when Sebastian Vettel
suffered a brake failure.

Hamilton also looked like he was back in the Zone after his
trying weekend with some stunning passing moves. But he ultimately lost it,
when McLaren called him in for a superfluous extra stop, a call Hamilton
described over the radio as ‘terrible’.
#

Hamilton drifts out of the Zone

Lewis Hamilton’s qualifying performance in Melbourne has
given ample indication of the importance of finding the right mental state for
racing. Hamilton’s run-in with the Melbourne traffic police on Friday – and the
predictably OTT media fallout – was enough to take him out of the Zone on
Saturday.

In the wake of last year’s ‘Liegate’ at the same event,
which similarly blew up out of all proportion, Hamilton said he had learned
from the experience and become a stronger driver and man. He has the perfect
chance to show how true that is from 11th on the grid for tomorrow’s Australian
Grand Prix.
#

Alonso takes opening win in Bahrain

Fernando Alonso looked like the first driver to find the
Zone in 2010, leading home team-mate Felipe Massa in a Ferrari one-two at the
Bahrain Grand Prix.

Alonso inherited the lead from Sebastian Vettel, when the
German’s Red Bull suffered a spark plug glitch late on. Vettel still limped to
4th, just behind Lewis Hamilton’s McLaren. Nico Rosberg pipped Michael
Schumacher to 5th in the Mercedes, with Jenson Button and Mark Webber next up.
#

Massa thanks God for successful return

Felipe Massa pointedly thanked God for his recovery from
injury during the televised press conference after returning to racing with
second place in Bahrain.

The Brazilian driver, like so many of his sporting
countrymen, has always had a strong faith. This part of the mentality of sport
is explored at length in Overdrive – with quotes from Massa, Rubens
Barrichello, Kaka, Cafu and others.
#

Bruno Senna makes it at last

After a desperate winter of waiting and worrying, Bruno
Senna has finally been confirmed as a driver with the renamed HRT F1 team.

The Brazilian, nephew of Ayrton, whose exploits are so
crucial to Overdrive, will make his F1 debut in Bahrain. The addition of yet
another famous name adds further to the astonishing line-up of stars for 2010.

 In ‘Overdrive’ Bruno admits that he has not
yet reached the same magical sensation of ‘the Zone’ as his uncle in a racing
car, though he’d felt it in karting before the break from racing imposed on him
by family tragedy. This mid-season start is unlikely to help him find it soon
but here’s hoping

From http://overdrivef1.com/news.html

Reproduced with permission (thanks Clyde and Overdrive)

craig
#

About
the submitter:

Craig is a motor racing “fanatic” ( a petrol-head”), who believes
in (and loves) helping others to find their passions and gifts… through
encouraging people to reach out for, then accomplish their “wildest”
dreams. He truly believes people can overcome obstacles, rise to any occasion,
and accomplish their dreams, even ‘Endless Possibilities, Far and Great
Horizons’ in life with enough FAITH and PERSISTENCE.

Craig is currently “working” on a new manuscript ‘INSIDE THE MIND OF
A GRAND PRIX CHAMPION, which forms part of true and inspirational stories of
‘Endless Possibilities: Let the Journey Begin’

He’s also currently writing a new book to be titled ‘Racing
in the Zone’
and/or ‘F1 In The Zone’. Obsessive or WHAT!!!

http://www.craiglockbooks.com http://www.selfgrowth.com/experts/craig_lock.html

The
various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 www.creativekiwis.com/index.php/books/74-craigs-books http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/craiglock+ www.lulu.com/craiglock

Craig’s
motor racing blogs are at grandprixchampion.wordpress.com and
grandprixdrivermyblog.wordpress.com

The
submitter’s other blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles,
books and new manuscripts) are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.com

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together,
one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact,
encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest
potentials…and so become ‘ever more champions of life’.”

This article
may be freely published, with acknowledgment to the source web site, thanks

PPS

For dearest dad
and ‘pal’, another ‘champion’ – see the dream never died…it’s just taken
another course!

“Sometimes
you have to give up the life you had planned… in order to live the life you
were meant to live.”

“I
want to write the way Gilles Villeneuve drove and power-slid his blood-red
Formula One Ferrari… with wild enthusiasm and a sense of abandonment, combined
with the artists craft of a Stirling Moss, a Jim Clark, and especially that of
the great Ayrton Senna, living on the razor-blade edge of life.”

for dearest mom and dad, your spirits lives on (forever)

thanks for all the support, encouragement and especially love

“All the world will be
happier and better, when the men and women have the souls of artists,, like
that of an Ayrton Senna.

– craig (as inspired by Rodin’s famous words)

PPS

Check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9QH8-lKEYY

!!!

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